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Showing library results for: military culture

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1 The psychological effects of mesothelioma in the UK military context from the carer’s perspective: A qualitative study

The psychological effects of mesothelioma in the UK military context from the carer’s perspective: A qualitative study

APA Citation:

Sherborne, V., & Tod, A. (2024). The psychological effects of mesothelioma in the UK military context from the carer's perspective: A qualitative study. Illness, Crisis & Loss, 32(2), 171-191. https://doi.org/10.1177/10541373221122964

Focus:

Mental health
Physical health
Veterans

Branch of Service:

International Military

Military Affiliation:

Veteran

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)
Aged (65 yrs & older)


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Research

Authors: Sherborne, Virginia; Tod, Angela; Taylor, Bethany

Year: 2024

Abstract

Mesothelioma is an incurable asbestos-related cancer with a high symptom burden. Its long lead time means cases in the military context tend to be amongst veterans. Research into the lived experience of mesothelioma is sparse. Research shows British veterans and their families are likely to have particular needs accessing health services and support. This study explored the psychological effects of mesothelioma in the UK military context from the carer's perspective. It comprised a secondary data analysis of interview data plus semi-structured interviews with family carers of UK veterans with a mesothelioma diagnosis. Themes developed included ‘Going the extra mile’; ‘Shifts in previously robust characteristics and roles’; and ‘Needing to know’. Military culture impacted both patients and carers, with participants reporting a reluctance to show weakness. Carers experienced guilt and traumatic stress symptoms. Moral injury was reported relating to carers’ interactions with the Ministry of Defence (MOD) and the National Health Service (NHS).

2 “The culture” is truly the issue: A preliminary exploration of active duty female spouses’ acculturation to military life

“The culture” is truly the issue: A preliminary exploration of active duty female spouses’ acculturation to military life

APA Citation:

Page, A. P., Ross, A. M., & Solomon, P. (2024). “The culture” is truly the issue: A preliminary exploration of active duty female spouses’ acculturation to military life. Families in Society. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1177/10443894231211357

Focus:

Mental health
Couples
Other

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches
Army
Navy
Marine Corps
Air Force
Coast Guard

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty
Veteran

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


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Research & Summary

Authors: Page, Amy P.; Ross, Abigail M.; Solomon, Phyllis

Year: 2024

Abstract

Acculturating to the Active Duty military lifestyle can be challenging yet rewarding. Using acculturation theory as a lens, this qualitative study explored experiences of women who transitioned into Active Duty culture through marrying a male service member. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected via online survey from women married to men currently or recently serving on Active Duty. In total, 202 survey responses were received, with 194 providing qualitative data. Data were analyzed using thematic analysis. Three themes were identified: descriptions of military culture, acculturation strategies, and processes involved with acculturation. Limitations include the cross-sectional and preliminary nature of the data. Findings can inform culturally responsive practice at all levels and indicate this is a fruitful area for further study.

3 Impacts of exposure to suicide of a military colleague from the lived experience of veterans: Informing postvention responses from a military cultural perspective

Impacts of exposure to suicide of a military colleague from the lived experience of veterans: Informing postvention responses from a military cultural perspective

APA Citation:

Jamieson, S. K., Cerel, J., & Maple, M. (2024). Impacts of exposure to suicide of a military colleague from the lived experience of veterans: Informing postvention responses from a military cultural perspective. Death Studies. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1080/07481187.2023.2261408

Focus:

Veterans
Trauma
Mental health

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Veteran

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


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Research

Authors: Jamieson, Sacha Kendall; Cerel, Julie; Maple, Myfanwy

Year: 2024

Abstract

Although exposure to the suicide death of a military colleague has been shown quantitatively to increase suicide risk factors among veterans, there are very few studies where veterans have been asked about this experience. This article presents a qualitative analysis of 38 interviews with U.S. veterans with exposure to the suicide death of a military colleague in past war operations. Participants described the impact of exposure in relation to the military context and official response to the death, which had long-term ramifications. Our findings suggest suicide prevention and postvention responses for veterans should be informed by the lived experience of veterans, including those for whom this experience occurred significantly in the past, as the impacts of different military policies and practices in response to suicide deaths over time are relevant to the impact of exposure to death of a military colleague in the short and long term.

4 Perspectives on military culture among veterans with a recent suicide attempt: Illustrating gender differences and informing suicide prevention

Perspectives on military culture among veterans with a recent suicide attempt: Illustrating gender differences and informing suicide prevention

APA Citation:

Tompkins, K. J., Roth, B., Wu, T. Y., Somohano, V. C., & Denneson, L. M. (2024). Perspectives on military culture among veterans with a recent suicide attempt: Illustrating gender differences and informing suicide prevention. Armed Forces & Society, 50(2), 404-417. https://doi.org/10.1177/0095327X221123375

Focus:

Veterans
Mental health
Trauma

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Veteran

Population:

Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)
Aged (65 yrs & older)


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Research

Authors: Tompkins, Kyla J.; Roth, Brandon; Wu, Tiona Y.; Somohano, Vanessa C.; Denneson, Lauren M.

Year: 2024

Abstract

This article aims to expand our understanding of military culture as it relates to gender and veterans? mental health, drawing from rich qualitative data. Fifty in-depth interviews (25 men, 25 women) were conducted with veterans who had a recent suicide attempt (within 6 months). Interviews revealed major themes of unequal standards and a hostile environment in the military. Women strived to fit in and experienced differential treatment in their physical training, professional expectations, and family life; men recollected masculine bonds and camaraderie through drinking. Women described the hostile environment of the military through their experiences of sexual violence and both genders described a culture of silence where signs of weakness were shamed. Findings support a cultural shift toward equitable gender norms for military members. Policy should focus on increased transparency institutionally?and between members?as well as improving protection and response to reported abuse.

5 “I’ve seen what evil men do”: Military mothering and children’s outdoor risky play

“I’ve seen what evil men do”: Military mothering and children’s outdoor risky play

APA Citation:

Bauer, M. E. E., Giles, A. R., & Brussoni, M. (2024). 'I’ve seen what evil men do’: Military mothering and children’s outdoor risky play. Leisure Sciences, 46(2), 150-166. https://doi.org/10.1080/01490400.2021.1920521

Focus:

Children
Parents

Branch of Service:

International Military

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


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Research & Summary

Authors: Bauer, Michelle E. E.; Giles, Audrey R.; Brussoni, Mariana

Year: 2024

Abstract

The restrictions on children’s outdoor risky play is emerging as a pressing public health concern. To the best of our knowledge, no research has examined military mothers’ perspectives on outdoor risky play. Military mothers have unique knowledge of war and combat and potential threats to children’s safety due to their communications with their partners in combat arms occupations. Their perspectives on outdoor risky play are important to consider to expand scholarly understandings of risk discourses in the context of military culture. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 16 military mothers from across Canada. The results of our reflexive thematic analysis are threefold: (1) Outdoor risky play in close physical proximity to strangers and cars is dangerous for children; (2) outdoor risky play should not result in children experiencing serious injuries; and (3) outdoor risky play can teach children to assess and manage risks.

6 Perspectives on a good death: A comparative study of veterans and civilians

Perspectives on a good death: A comparative study of veterans and civilians

APA Citation:

Suntai, Z., Laha-Walsh, K., & Albright, D. L. (2024). Perspectives on a good death: A comparative study of veterans and civilians. Death Studies, 48(3), 276-285. https://doi.org/10.1080/07481187.2023.2219641

Focus:

Veterans
Mental health
Other

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Veteran

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)


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Research

Authors: Suntai, Zainab; Laha-Walsh, Kirsten; Albright, David L.

Year: 2024

Abstract

This study aimed to identify any differences between veterans and non-veterans in the importance of domains of the Good Death Inventory. Participants were recruited from Amazon Mechanical Turk to complete a Qualtrics survey on the importance of the 18 domains of the Good Death Inventory scale. Logistic regression models were then used to analyze any differences between veterans (n = 241) and nonveterans (n = 1151). Results showed that veterans (mostly aged 31–50, men, and White) were more likely to indicate that pursuing all treatment possible and maintaining their pride were important aspects of a good death. The results support other studies that have found military culture to be a significant factor in the way veterans view preferences at the end of life. Interventions may include increasing access to palliative care and hospice services for military members and veterans and providing education/training on end-of-life care for healthcare providers who work with this population.

7 Mental health of Canadian children growing up in military families: The child perspective

Mental health of Canadian children growing up in military families: The child perspective

APA Citation:

Williams, A., Cramm, H., Khalid-Khan, S., Reddy, P., Groll, D., Rühland, L., & Hill, S. (2024). Mental health of Canadian children growing up in military families: The child perspective. Armed Forces & Society, 50(2), 362-382. https://doi.org/10.1177/0095327X221128837

Focus:

Children
Programming
Mental health

Branch of Service:

International Military

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty

Population:

Childhood (birth - 12 yrs)
Adolescence (13 - 17 yrs)


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Research & Summary

Authors: Williams, Ashley; Cramm, Heidi; Khalid-Khan, Sarosh; Reddy, Pappu; Groll, Dianne; Rühland, Lucia; Hill, Shannon

Year: 2024

Abstract

A recent scoping review indicated military-connected children face stressors that may increase mental health issues. However, the majority of the included literature was American. To examine the experiences of Canadian military-connected children, we conducted in-depth interviews with a purposive sample of Canadian military-connected youth using a qualitative description approach. We conducted a content analysis on interview data, supported by qualitative data analysis software (MAXQDA), with coding done by two researchers who met regularly to discuss coding agreement. Thirteen children in military families participated and described the mental health impact of frequent mobility, parental absence, and risk of parental injury. The experiences of our participants were consistent with the results of an earlier scoping review on this topic. Our results suggest improving military cultural competence among health care providers and enhancing parental support may positively impact child well-being. More research is needed to understand resilience and vulnerability among Canadian military-connected children.

8 Considering the psychological experience of amputation and rehabilitation for military veterans: A systematic review and metasynthesis of qualitative research

Considering the psychological experience of amputation and rehabilitation for military veterans: A systematic review and metasynthesis of qualitative research

APA Citation:

Murray, C. D., Havlin, H., & Molyneaux, V. (2024). Considering the psychological experience of amputation and rehabilitation for military veterans: A systematic review and metasynthesis of qualitative research. Disability and Rehabilitation, 46(6), 1053-1072. https://doi.org/10.1080/09638288.2023.2182915

Focus:

Physical health
Veterans

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Veteran

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


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Research

Authors: Murray, Craig D.; Havlin, Heather; Molyneaux, Victoria

Year: 2024

Abstract

Purpose Research highlights the differences and unique experiences of military veterans experiencing amputation compared to civilians. This review aimed to synthesise qualitative research exploring the experience of amputation and rehabilitation among existing or previous members of the military.Methods A systematic search of six databases (PsycINFO, AMED, MEDLINE, CINAHL, Web of Science and Scopus) was undertaken in March 2022. The results of 17 papers reporting 12 studies published between 2009 and 2022 were synthesised using a meta-ethnographic approach to generate new interpretations reflecting the experiences of members of the military who have experienced limb loss.Results Three themes were developed from the data: (1) Making the physical and psychological transition to life after amputation; (2) The role of the military culture in rehabilitation; and (3) The impact of relationships and the gaze of others during rehabilitation and beyond.Conclusions Military veterans with limb loss experience difficulties in navigating civilian healthcare systems and gaining appropriate support away from the military. Rehabilitation professionals, with psychological training or mentoring, involved in the care of military veterans following amputation could offer psychological support during the transition to civilian life and targeted therapies to veterans experiencing high levels of pain, and facilitate peer support programmes.

9 The Positive Relational Couples Therapy Model: A group therapeutic approach for LGBTQIA+ military couples

The Positive Relational Couples Therapy Model: A group therapeutic approach for LGBTQIA+ military couples

APA Citation:

Morris, C., Wright, G., & Herbert, L. (2024). The positive relational couples therapy model: A group therapeutic approach for LGBTQIA+ military couples. The Family Journal. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1177/10664807241235323

Focus:

Couples
Programming
Mental health

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


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Research & Summary

Authors: Morris, Crystal; Wright, Galaxina; Herbert, Léa

Year: 2024

Abstract

Given the history of discrimination and increased mental health risks surrounding LGBTQIA+ service members, group counseling is a practical approach for practitioners to mitigate effects in a therapeutic setting. This article synthesizes the Positive Relational Couples Therapy (PRCT) model, incorporating concepts of the Multicultural and Social Justice Counseling Competencies (MSJCC), Relational-Cultural Theory (RCT), the PERMA model, and Gottman's Method Couples Therapy as a group process to provide a conceptual framework. An outline of the PRCT model and case illustration are provided for practitioners for group counseling with LGBTQIA+ military couples. Practical group considerations and implications for this work are discussed.

10 United States Army Reserve/National Guard soldiers’ healthcare experiences, attitudes, and preferences: Differences based on deployment status

United States Army Reserve/National Guard soldiers’ healthcare experiences, attitudes, and preferences: Differences based on deployment status

APA Citation:

Hoopsick, R. A., Vest, B. M., Homish, D. L., & Homish, G. G. (2024). United States Army Reserve/National Guard soldiers’ healthcare experiences, attitudes, and preferences: Differences based on deployment status. Psychology, Health & Medicine. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1080/13548506.2024.2303409

Focus:

Deployment
Physical health
Mental health

Branch of Service:

Army

Military Affiliation:

Reserve
Guard

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


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Research

Authors: Hoopsick, Rachel A.; Vest, Bonnie M.; Homish, D. Lynn; Homish, Gregory G.

Year: 2024

Abstract

Some United States Army Reserve/National Guard (USAR/NG) soldiers have substantial health needs, which may be service-related, but not necessarily resulting from deployment. However, most USAR/NG members need to have been deployed to qualify for Veterans Administration (VA) benefits. Therefore, many USAR/NG soldiers seek care from civilian healthcare providers (HCPs). Using a subset (N = 430 current/former soldiers) of Operation: SAFETY study data, we used regression models to examine differences in healthcare experiences, attitudes, and preferences by deployment status (never-deployed vs. previously-deployed). Final models controlled for age, sex, rank (enlisted vs. officer), military status (current vs. former military), and RAND SF-36 General Health Score. Over 40% of soldiers agreed that civilian HCPs should ask patients about their military service, but never-deployed soldiers were less likely to report being asked about their service (p < 0.05) or how their service affects their health (p < 0.10). Never-deployed soldiers were also less likely to attribute their health concerns to military service (p < 0.001). Although never-deployed soldiers were more likely to prefer receiving physical (p < 0.05) and mental (p < 0.05) healthcare outside of the VA than previously-deployed soldiers, never-deployed soldiers had low confidence in their HCP’s understanding of their needs (49% thought that their civilian HCP did not understand them; 71% did not think that their civilian HCP could address military-related health concerns; 76% thought that their civilian HCP did not understand military culture). Findings demonstrate that although civilian HCPs may be the preferred (and only) choice for never-deployed USAR/NG soldiers, they may need additional support to provide care to this population.

11 A peer veteran approach to the caring letters suicide prevention program: Preliminary data

A peer veteran approach to the caring letters suicide prevention program: Preliminary data

APA Citation:

Livingston, W. S., Carter, S. P., Leitner, R., Ton, A. T., Gebhardt, H., Zoellner, L. A., Mizik, N., Rojas, S. M., Buchholz, J. R., & Reger, M. A. (2024). A peer veteran approach to the caring letters suicide prevention program: Preliminary data. Psychological Services, 21(1), 1–12. https://doi.org/10.1037/ser0000760

Focus:

Veterans
Programming
Mental health

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches
Air Force
Army
Navy
Marine Corps
Coast Guard

Military Affiliation:

Veteran
Reserve

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


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Research & Summary

Authors: Livingston, Whitney S.; Carter, Sarah P.; Leitner, Rebecca; Ton, Andrew T.; Gebhardt, Heather; Zoellner, Lori A.; Mizik, Natalie; Rojas, Sasha M.; Buchholz, Jonathan R.; Reger, Mark A.

Year: 2024

Abstract

Caring Letters is a prevention program aimed at reducing suicide risk; however, clinical trials indicate mixed results among military and veteran samples. The present study aimed to pilot a new version of the Caring Letters intervention that was adapted to military culture in order to emphasize peer support. The supportive letters, traditionally sent from clinicians, were written by peer veterans (PVs) who volunteered from local Veteran Service Organizations (VSOs). PVs (n = 15) attended a 4-hr workshop to learn about Caring Letters and write six letters to a veteran with a recent hospitalization for suicide risk (hospitalized veterans [HVs]; n = 15 completed a baseline assessment). Letters from PVs were sent to HVs once a month for 6 months following discharge from the psychiatric inpatient unit. The study used a limited efficacy approach to examine feasibility outcomes including implementation procedures, participant recruitment and retention rates, and barriers and facilitators. Acceptability measures examined HV satisfaction, perceived privacy and safety, and PV workshop satisfaction. Among HVs, results suggested that suicidal ideation improved from baseline to follow-up (g = 3.19). Results suggested resilience scores improved among HVs (g = 0.99). Results also suggested a possible reduction in stigma associated with mental health treatment among PVs at 1-month postworkshop assessment. Interpretation of the results is limited by the design and sample size, but the results provide preliminary support for the feasibility and acceptability of a PV approach to Caring Letters. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)

12 Gender role reversal: Civilian husbands of U.S. military servicewomen as tied-migrant workers

Gender role reversal: Civilian husbands of U.S. military servicewomen as tied-migrant workers

APA Citation:

Dowling, L. E., Jackson, J. B., & Landers, A. L. (2024). Gender role reversal: Civilian husbands of U.S. military servicewomen as tied-migrant workers. Family Relations, 73(1), 441-465. https://doi.org/10.1111/fare.12936

Focus:

Mental health
Other

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches
Army
Marine Corps
Air Force
Navy

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


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Research & Summary

Authors: Dowling, L. Emily; Jackson, Jeffrey B.; Landers, Ashley L.

Year: 2024

Abstract

Objective This qualitative study examined the experiences of male spouses of female service members in the U.S. military (civilian husbands of servicewomen) in their positions as tied-migrant workers. Background Employment of civilian husbands of servicewomen is frequently affected when they geographically relocate due to their wives' military service. Because societal norms for husbands as primary breadwinners in marriages persist and the majority of military couples consist of male service members married to female civilian spouses, civilian husbands of servicewomen may experience a gender role reversal in their identities as a spouse and as a provider within their relationships and military culture. Method Semistructured interviews were conducted with 22 civilian husbands who experienced at least one geographic relocation due to their wife's military service. Descriptive phenomenological analysis was used to discover the essence of participants' experiences. Results Themes around defining masculinity, minority experiences in the military, and nontraditional gender provider roles as tied-migrant workers emerged. Participants experienced a gender role reversal as tied-migrant workers and as military spouses, and they had some difficulties integrating into military communities. Participants expanded their masculine identities to include performing traditionally feminine tasks and valuing egalitarianism in their spousal relationships when they experienced barriers to breadwinning. Conclusion Findings indicated the importance of emotional support as civilian husbands navigate their masculine identities and relationships both with spouses and as gender minorities in their communities. Implications Clinical recommendations for psychotherapists are provided with an emphasis on using emotionally focused therapy with couples consisting of civilian husbands and servicewomen.

13 Health behavior profiles and association with mental health status among US active-duty service members

Health behavior profiles and association with mental health status among US active-duty service members

APA Citation:

Olapeju, B., Hendrickson, Z., Shanahan, P., Mushtaq, O., & Ahmed, A. (2024). Health behavior profiles and association with mental health status among US active-duty service members. Frontiers in Public Health, 12, Article 1324663. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpubh.2024.1324663

Focus:

Mental health
Substance use
Physical health

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)


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Research

Authors: Olapeju, Bolanle; Hendrickson, Zoe; Shanahan, Patrice; Mushtaq, Omar; Ahmed, Anwar

Year: 2024

Abstract

Introduction: This study investigated the clustering of health behaviors among US active duty servicemembers (ADSM) into risk profiles and explored the association between these profiles with ADSM sociodemographic characteristics and mental health status.Methods: This study utilized secondary data from the 2018 Health Related Behaviors Survey (HRBS), a Department of Defense (DoD) self-administered online survey. Health behaviors included physical activity, screen use, sleep habits, tobacco/substance use, alcohol drinking, preventive health care seeking and condom use at last sex/ having multiple sexual partners. Past-year mental health status was measured using the Kessler Screening Scale for Psychological Distress (K6). Latent class analysis (LCA) on health behaviors was used to cluster ADSMs into risk profiles. Multivariable logistic model was used to examine whether ADSM characteristics and mental health status were associated with ADSMs' risk profiles.Results: The LCA identified a four-class model that clustered ADSMs into the following sub-groups:(1) Risk Inclined (14.4%), (2) Screen UsersHigh Screen Users (51.1%), (3) Poor Sleepers (23.9%) and (4) Risk Averse (10.6). Over a tenth (16.4%) of ADSMs were categorized as having serious psychological distress. Being male, younger, less educated, in the Army, Marine Corps or Navy were associated with higher odds of being Risk Inclined (AOR ranging from 1.26 to 2.42). Compared to the reference group of Risk Adverse ADSMs, those categorized as Risk Inclined (AOR: 8.30; 95% CI: 5.16-13.36), Screen UsersHigh Screen Users (AOR: 2.44; 95% CI: 1.56-3.82) and Poor Sleepers (AOR: 5.26; 95% CI: 3.38-8.19) had significantly higher odds of having serious psychological distress.Discussion: Study findings suggest opportunities to tailor behavioral and health promotion interventions for each of the distinct risk profiles. For example, ADSM described as Risk Inclined may benefit from preventive mental health services. Solutions for ADSM described as Poor Sleepers may include education on sleep hygiene; instituting duty schedules; and shifting military cultural norms to promote sleep hygiene as a pathway to optimal performance and thus military readiness. ADSM with low-risk behavior profiles such as those described as Risk Averse may prove beneficial in the roll-out of interventions as they act as peer-educators or mentors.

14 Intimate partner violence and abuse: A qualitative exploration of UK military personnel and civilian partner experiences

Intimate partner violence and abuse: A qualitative exploration of UK military personnel and civilian partner experiences

APA Citation:

Lane, R., Gribble, R., Alves-Costa, F., Taylor, A., Howard, L. M., Fear, N. T., & MacManus, D. (2024). Intimate partner violence and abuse: A qualitative exploration of UK military personnel and civilian partner experiences. Journal of Family Violence, 39, 285-301. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10896-022-00446-x

Focus:

Couples
Trauma

Branch of Service:

International Military

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


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Research

Authors: Lane, Rebecca; Gribble, Rachael; Alves-Costa, Filipa; Taylor, Anna; Howard, Louise M.; Fear, Nicola T.; MacManus, Deirdre

Year: 2024

Abstract

Purpose The prevalence of Intimate Partner Violence and Abuse (IPVA) perpetration and victimisation has been found to be higher in serving and ex-serving military samples compared to civilians. Despite this, there is a lack of qualitative research exploring the IPVA experiences of couples in which one or both partners are serving or have served in the military. This qualitative study aimed to explore IPVA experiences within the UK military community from the perspective of serving and ex-serving military personnel and civilian partners of UK military personnel. Method One-to-one telephone interviews were conducted with 40 serving and ex-serving military personnel (29 male, 11 female) and 25 female civilian partners. Data was analysed using thematic analysis. Results Four superordinate themes were derived: (1) patterns and directions of IPVA, (2) types of IPVA, (3) perceived drivers of IPVA and (4) perceived impact of IPVA. The findings point to frequent bidirectional abuse in part driven by poor communication and emotion regulation, whilst also highlighting the experiences of severe IPVA victimisation of civilian partners by military personnel motivated by power and control. Perceived drivers of both IPVA perpetration and victimisation include military factors borne of military culture or training, alcohol and mental health difficulties. Conclusion These results highlight the role of cultural norms, as well as the role of emotion dysregulation, poor communication skills and mental health difficulties in explaining and perpetuating abuse within ecological theoretical frameworks of violence among couples within which one or both partners are serving or ex-serving military personnel.

15 Male sex and hazardous alcohol use following military sexual assault increase suicide risk among US service members and veterans

Male sex and hazardous alcohol use following military sexual assault increase suicide risk among US service members and veterans

APA Citation:

Blais, R. K., Xu, B., Tannahill, H., & Dulin, P. (2024). Male sex and hazardous alcohol use following military sexual assault increase suicide risk among US service members and veterans. European Journal of Psychotraumatology, 15(1), Article 2312756. https://doi.org/10.1080/20008066.2024.2312756

Focus:

Mental health
Substance use

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty
Veteran

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


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Research

Authors: Blais, Rebecca K.; Xu, Bingyu; Tannahill, Hallie; Dulin, Patrick

Year: 2024

Abstract

Background: Higher alcohol use and military sexual assault (MSA) are associated with increased risk of death by suicide. Risk for death by suicide is rapidly increasing among females, who report higher rates of MSA, yet actual death by suicide and alcohol use are higher among males. It is not well understood whether higher alcohol use confers greater suicide risk in male or female service members and veterans who have experienced MSA. Objective: To determine whether the association between alcohol misuse and suicide risk was moderated by biological sex in a sample of male and female service members (N = 400, 50% female) who reported MSA. Method: Participants completed surveys of alcohol use and suicide risk as well as a demographic inventory. Linear regression with an interaction term was used to determine if suicide risk differed by sex and alcohol use severity after accounting for discharge status, sexual orientation, and age. Results: Average scores on the suicide risk measure were consistent with an inpatient psychiatric sample and scores on the AUDIT-C were indicative of a probable positive screen for alcohol misuse. Suicide risk was most pronounced among males who reported higher levels of hazardous alcohol use. A sensitivity analysis examining suicide risk by sex and screening results for alcohol misuse (positive/negative) showed that men with a probable positive screen had higher suicide risk. Discussion: The current study provides novel findings on suicide risk among survivors of military sexual violence by including both male and female survivors. Interventions to decrease suicide risk following MSA may consider alcohol reduction strategies, and optimizing these interventions in males. Engaging military culture at both the US Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs to encourage more healthy alcohol consumption may mitigate this public health concern. Future research may consider how country of origin relates to these associations. Average scores for the suicide risk measure and alcohol use were high among a sample of male and female survivors of military sexual assault.Suicide risk was most pronounced among males who reported higher levels of hazardous alcohol use.A sensitivity analysis examining suicide risk by sex and screening results for alcohol misuse (positive/negative) showed that men with a probable positive screen had higher suicide risk. Average scores for the suicide risk measure and alcohol use were high among a sample of male and female survivors of military sexual assault. Suicide risk was most pronounced among males who reported higher levels of hazardous alcohol use. A sensitivity analysis examining suicide risk by sex and screening results for alcohol misuse (positive/negative) showed that men with a probable positive screen had higher suicide risk.

16 Sexual and reproductive health in military settings: A qualitative study

Sexual and reproductive health in military settings: A qualitative study

APA Citation:

Vargas, S. E., Thornton, K., Norris, C., Gist, G., Clark, M. F., Ramirez, L., Guillen, M., Guthrie, K. M., & Landoll, R. R. (2024). Sexual and reproductive health in military settings: A qualitative study. Military Psychology. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1080/08995605.2024.2324644

Focus:

Youth
Physical health

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches
Army
Navy
Air Force
Marine Corps
Coast Guard

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


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Research & Summary

Authors: Vargas, Sara E.; Thornton, Kade; Norris, Colby; Gist, Galen; Clark, Madison F.; Ramirez, Leslie; Guillen, Melissa; Guthrie, Kate M.; Landoll, Ryan R.

Year: 2024

Abstract

Mission readiness is critical to the operational success of the United States (US) military and includes having a healthy and fit fighting force. Service members and their dependents have access to a wide range of sexual and reproductive health services with no out-of-pocket costs. Despite this access, negative outcomes such as sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and unintended pregnancy persist. Semi-structured, in-depth interviews were conducted with service members and stakeholders (e.g. medical providers). Interviews explored the individual, interpersonal, organizational, and institutional factors that inform sexual norms, behaviors, and healthcare experiences in the US military. Interview transcripts were coded manually; data were summarized for themes related to unique aspects of military culture and healthcare affecting sexual and reproductive health. Twenty-five (25) service members and 15 stakeholders completed interviews. Four themes emerged: 1) despite free access, both general and military-specific barriers to sexual and reproductive healthcare persist; 2) general and military-specific cultural norms apply to sexual behavior and care seeking; 3) sexual and reproductive health-related norms can be perceived as confusing and contradictory within the military; and 4) resources addressing sexual assault are ubiquitous in military settings, but resources addressing prevention of STIs and unintended pregnancy are limited. Both general and military-specific norms, behavior, and healthcare experiences need to be considered in clinical care, public health campaigns, and other efforts to promote sexual and reproductive health in military settings.

17 Women veterans’ definitions of peer support: A qualitative description analysis

Women veterans’ definitions of peer support: A qualitative description analysis

APA Citation:

Mendez, P. M., Slifka, L. M., Daniels, L. B., & Hansen, C. (2023). The association between early life trauma and veteran reintegration to civilian life. Military Behavioral Health. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1080/21635781.2023.2267434

Focus:

Veterans
Mental health
Other

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Veteran

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


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Research & Summary

Authors: Matteson, Amanda L.; Hardiman, Eric R.

Year: 2024

Abstract

This study examines peer support among women who served in the U.S. military. Women Veterans reported peer support to be helpful for mental health and well-being by meeting social, emotional, and concrete needs. Participants found peer support to be acceptable, non-clinical, and non-stigmatizing. Critical elements of peer support included a safe environment, someone to listen to and validate them, and the shared experience of serving as women in the military. Peer support was particularly helpful for discussing sexism, sexual assault, and trauma. Mental health providers should understand the importance of peer support for women Veterans and how it is a distinct and complementary service to clinical treatment. Peer support programs can help ensure women Veterans’ needs are considered in service delivery. Introduction: Women are the fastest-growing subpopulation of U.S. military Veterans, yet their voices have rarely been used to explore peer support among Veterans. This study defines Veteran peer support from the perspective of women Veterans and aims to increase providers’ awareness of the value of peer support for improving Veteran mental health. Methods: Data were drawn from a multi-site evaluation of Veteran peer programs. Transcripts from semi-structured interviews with women Veterans (N = 25) were selected and analyzed. Guided by a qualitative description approach, the researchers used in vivo coding to capture common descriptive language used by the Veterans. Themes were drawn by the primary researcher and audited by a second researcher to increase the findings’ trustworthiness. Results: Women Veterans described peer support as a relationship between Veterans based on shared military experience, an understanding of military culture, and similar life challenges. Emerging themes regarding peer support included viewing peers as genuine, trustworthy friends, empathizing over shared struggles, cultivating a safe, non-judgmental, egalitarian space to discuss sensitive topics, using a non-stigmatizing, non-clinical approach, and being a source of fun and social connection. Discussion: Participants provided evidence that peer support is a meaningful, authentic, and accessible means of exchanging emotional and concrete assistance for women Veterans. Mental health providers and program developers working with women Veterans need to understand the importance of peer support in complementing therapy and how it can be essential for women Veterans to discuss sensitive topics such as sexual assault or harassment they experienced in the military.

18 Veterans, military culture, and the therapeutic alliance

Veterans, military culture, and the therapeutic alliance

APA Citation:

Gunther, D. (2023). Veterans, military culture, and the therapeutic alliance [PhD, Auburn University]. https://etd.auburn.edu/bitstream/handle/10415/9055/DG%20Dissertation%20Final.pdf?sequence=2&isAllowed=y

Focus:

Veterans
Mental health
Other

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Veteran

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


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Other

Authors: Gunther, Dylan

Year: 2023

Abstract

Understanding how military culture influences the therapeutic alliance is vital to ensuring competent and ethical care for the veteran population. A qualitative analysis incorporating a social constructionist framework, that comprised of six in-depth interviews was conducted with veterans. Utilizing an inductive thematic decomposition analysis two primary themes were developed with seven subordinate themes. The first primary theme developed was Military Culture which is composed of four subordinate themes: Military Culture Shapes Identity, Interpersonal Challenges, Selective Trust Means Security, Mental Health Stigma Means Consequence; that describe different aspects of military culture that contributed to the therapeutic alliance. The second primary theme developed was Therapist Skills, which includes three subordinate themes: Accountability Through Confrontation, Active Listening Builds Rapport, Collaboration Creates Agency, that identify the skills unrelated to culture that positively influenced development of the therapeutic alliance.

19 Examining the perception of military culture in the undergraduate university classroom

Examining the perception of military culture in the undergraduate university classroom

APA Citation:

Boldway, H., Valenti, E., & Zafonte, M. (2023). Examining the perception of military culture in the undergraduate university classroom. The Journal of Continuing Higher Education. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1080/07377363.2023.2196647

Focus:

Veterans
Other

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Veteran

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


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Research

Authors: Boldway, Heidi; Valenti, Elizabeth; Zafonte, Maria

Year: 2023

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine how college students perceive and experience learning with military student peers in traditional undergraduate college classrooms. A mixed method approach was selected, using an online survey that included the nine-item questionnaire Military Culture Certificate Program (MCCP) assessment scale survey. Data were collected from 255 students who took part in the survey, which assessed nonmilitary students’ knowledge of the unique military culture and environment, deployment dynamics, family dynamics, military ethics, behavioral and physical health issues, and combat experiences. A follow-up focus group solicited qualitative data from six nonmilitary affiliated students pertaining to their individual lived experiences and classroom interactions with their military student peers. Qualitative data from the focus group suggested that almost half of the students respected the experience of being deployed, based on the self-observations of family members. They also reported an understanding of the impact military life has on family members. Several qualitative themes emerged in the focus group responses, all of which have implications for improving cultural competence in the classroom.

20 Veteran transition to civilian life: Leveraging the strengths of military culture

Veteran transition to civilian life: Leveraging the strengths of military culture

APA Citation:

Westwood, M. J., & Israelashvili, M. (2023). Veteran transition to civilian life: Leveraging the strengths of military culture. In M. Israelashvili (Ed.), Prevention of Maladjustment to Life Course Transitions (pp. 341–363). Springer International Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-031-26700-0_13

Focus:

Veterans
Other

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Veteran

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


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Book Chapter

Authors: Westwood, Marvin J.; Israelashvili, Moshe; Israelashvili, Moshe

Year: 2023

Abstract

The sharp differences between civilian culture and military culture, referred to as Dichotomous Cultures, turn the transition into the army and the transition out of the army to be extremely difficult. This is true especially for veterans who served in combat units, in which masculinity is the leading motive, who sometimes describe their transition to civilian life as “from hero to zero.” Moreover, veterans are often reluctant to seek help, due to their military conditioning, traditional masculine values, and stigma. The Veteran’s Transition Program (VTP) is a group-based program that has been shown to directly meet the transitional needs of veterans. Rather than being stigmatized as weakness, VTP reframes help seeking as a valid, courageous sign of strength that is a necessary prerequisite for helping others. Hence, by reducing the trauma-related effects of service, VTP helps veteran to effectively move back to a normal functioning life.

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