(334) 844-3299
MilitaryREACH@auburn.edu
Search Results
Make a new Search
Search in Library (1710) Results

Library (1710)

Dictionary (738)

Research in Action (97)

News (57)

Showing library results for: ALL

Filters: Research Summary

1 - 20 of 1710

1 Traumatic brain injury and relationship distress during military deployment and reunion

Traumatic brain injury and relationship distress during military deployment and reunion

APA Citation:

Knobloch, L. K., & Abendschein, B. (2024). Traumatic brain injury and relationship distress during military deployment and reunion. Family Relations, 73(1), 424-440. https://doi.org/10.1111/fare.12849

Focus:

Trauma
Deployment
Mental health
Couples
Physical health

Branch of Service:

Army

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Knobloch, Leanne K.; Abendschein, Bryan

Year: 2024

Abstract

Objective This study seeks to advance the literature by disentangling the effects of deployment-acquired traumatic brain injury (TBI) from comorbid postconcussive symptoms and PTSD symptoms on relationship distress. Background Because TBI poses challenges to military marriages, understanding the predictors of relationship distress after TBI is important for helping service members cope with the effects of the injury. Method Survey data from the U.S. Army STARRS Pre–Post Deployment Study, collected from 2,585 married service members before and after a combat deployment to Afghanistan, evaluated predictors of relationship distress 9 months after homecoming. Results Deployment-acquired TBI corresponded with more relationship distress controlling for predeployment brain health, but its predictive power was eclipsed by concurrent postconcussive symptoms and concurrent PTSD symptoms. Concurrent PTSD symptoms accounted for twice as much variance in relationship distress than concurrent postconcussive symptoms. Conclusion Targeting and treating comorbid conditions may be essential for supporting military marriages after TBI. Implications: Military command, policymakers, and medical professionals may find value in broadening support services for TBI to include resources addressing postconcussive symptoms, PTSD symptoms, and relationship distress.

2 “I’ve seen what evil men do”: Military mothering and children’s outdoor risky play

“I’ve seen what evil men do”: Military mothering and children’s outdoor risky play

APA Citation:

Bauer, M. E. E., Giles, A. R., & Brussoni, M. (2024). 'I’ve seen what evil men do’: Military mothering and children’s outdoor risky play. Leisure Sciences, 46(2), 150-166. https://doi.org/10.1080/01490400.2021.1920521

Focus:

Children
Parents

Branch of Service:

International Military

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Bauer, Michelle E. E.; Giles, Audrey R.; Brussoni, Mariana

Year: 2024

Abstract

The restrictions on children’s outdoor risky play is emerging as a pressing public health concern. To the best of our knowledge, no research has examined military mothers’ perspectives on outdoor risky play. Military mothers have unique knowledge of war and combat and potential threats to children’s safety due to their communications with their partners in combat arms occupations. Their perspectives on outdoor risky play are important to consider to expand scholarly understandings of risk discourses in the context of military culture. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 16 military mothers from across Canada. The results of our reflexive thematic analysis are threefold: (1) Outdoor risky play in close physical proximity to strangers and cars is dangerous for children; (2) outdoor risky play should not result in children experiencing serious injuries; and (3) outdoor risky play can teach children to assess and manage risks.

3 Veteran caretaker perspectives of the need for childcare assistance during health care appointments

Veteran caretaker perspectives of the need for childcare assistance during health care appointments

APA Citation:

Shepherd-Banigan, M., Cannedy, S., Rodriguez, A. N., Burns, M., Woolson, S., Hamilton, A., Quiroz, I., Matthews, H., Garber-Cardwell, D., Byrd, K. G., Brown, A., & Goldstein, K. M. (2024). Veteran caretaker perspectives of the need for childcare assistance during health care appointments. Women's Health Issues, 34(1), 98-106. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.whi.2023.08.005

Focus:

Veterans
Programming

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Veteran

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Shepherd-Banigan, Megan; Cannedy, Shay; Rodriguez, Adelmira N.; Burns, Madison; Woolson, Sandra; Hamilton, Alison; Quiroz, Ismael; Matthews, Hanh; Garber-Cardwell, Diane; Byrd, Kaileigh G.; Brown, Adrian; Goldstein, Karen M.

Year: 2024

Abstract

Purpose In 2020, Congress passed legislation to establish the national Veterans Child Care Assistance Program (VCAP) targeting eligible veterans receiving care through the Veterans Health Administration (VA). This needs assessment describes the childcare needs of veteran caretakers of young children and explores the implications of inadequate childcare on health care engagement. Methods Survey data were collected from 2,000 VA users with dependent children; data were analyzed using standard descriptive statistics. Qualitative data were collected from 19 veterans through focus groups and analyzed using rapid thematic analysis. Findings More than 75% of veterans surveyed indicated that they required childcare assistance during health care appointments and 73% reported barriers to finding childcare. Prominent barriers included the high cost of childcare and not having a trusted source of childcare. Nearly 58% of survey respondents reported missed or canceled VA health care appointments due to childcare challenges. Furthermore, 35% of surveyed veterans reported that their children had accompanied them to an appointment in the past year. Among these veterans, 59% brought their children into the exam room. Focus group participants discussed how having children present during their health care appointments hampered communication with health care providers. Conclusions Veterans report that lack of childcare keeps them from attending and remaining focused on the provider during their health care visits, which could compromise quality of care. As one of the only health systems in the United States that will offer childcare assistance, VCAP presents an opportunity to improve health care access and quality by reducing missed appointments and suboptimal care.

4 A peer veteran approach to the caring letters suicide prevention program: Preliminary data

A peer veteran approach to the caring letters suicide prevention program: Preliminary data

APA Citation:

Livingston, W. S., Carter, S. P., Leitner, R., Ton, A. T., Gebhardt, H., Zoellner, L. A., Mizik, N., Rojas, S. M., Buchholz, J. R., & Reger, M. A. (2024). A peer veteran approach to the caring letters suicide prevention program: Preliminary data. Psychological Services, 21(1), 1–12. https://doi.org/10.1037/ser0000760

Focus:

Veterans
Programming
Mental health

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches
Air Force
Army
Navy
Marine Corps
Coast Guard

Military Affiliation:

Veteran
Reserve

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Livingston, Whitney S.; Carter, Sarah P.; Leitner, Rebecca; Ton, Andrew T.; Gebhardt, Heather; Zoellner, Lori A.; Mizik, Natalie; Rojas, Sasha M.; Buchholz, Jonathan R.; Reger, Mark A.

Year: 2024

Abstract

Caring Letters is a prevention program aimed at reducing suicide risk; however, clinical trials indicate mixed results among military and veteran samples. The present study aimed to pilot a new version of the Caring Letters intervention that was adapted to military culture in order to emphasize peer support. The supportive letters, traditionally sent from clinicians, were written by peer veterans (PVs) who volunteered from local Veteran Service Organizations (VSOs). PVs (n = 15) attended a 4-hr workshop to learn about Caring Letters and write six letters to a veteran with a recent hospitalization for suicide risk (hospitalized veterans [HVs]; n = 15 completed a baseline assessment). Letters from PVs were sent to HVs once a month for 6 months following discharge from the psychiatric inpatient unit. The study used a limited efficacy approach to examine feasibility outcomes including implementation procedures, participant recruitment and retention rates, and barriers and facilitators. Acceptability measures examined HV satisfaction, perceived privacy and safety, and PV workshop satisfaction. Among HVs, results suggested that suicidal ideation improved from baseline to follow-up (g = 3.19). Results suggested resilience scores improved among HVs (g = 0.99). Results also suggested a possible reduction in stigma associated with mental health treatment among PVs at 1-month postworkshop assessment. Interpretation of the results is limited by the design and sample size, but the results provide preliminary support for the feasibility and acceptability of a PV approach to Caring Letters. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)

5 Linking observing and nonreactivity mindfulness to parenting: Moderated direct and indirect effects via inhibitory control

Linking observing and nonreactivity mindfulness to parenting: Moderated direct and indirect effects via inhibitory control

APA Citation:

Zhang, N., Zhang, J., Gewirtz, A. H., & Deater-Deckard, K. (2024). Linking observing and nonreactivity mindfulness to parenting: Moderated direct and indirect effects via inhibitory control. Journal of Family Psychology, 38(1), 71–81. https://doi.org/10.1037/fam0001152

Focus:

Parents
Children

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty

Population:

Childhood (birth - 12 yrs)
Preschool age (2 -5 yrs)
School age (6 - 12 yrs)
Adolescence (13 - 17 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Zhang, Na; Zhang, Jingchen; Gewirtz, Abigail H.; Deater-Deckard, Kirby

Year: 2024

Abstract

To disentangle the effects of key dimensions of dispositional mindfulness on parenting, the present study tests the hypotheses that parental Nonreactivity moderates the association between Observing and effective parenting behaviors, and that parental inhibitory control mediates the relationship between Observing and parenting depending on levels of Nonreactivity. The sample consists of 294 fathers (95.9% deployed) and 313 mothers (81.5% nondeployed) from 336 military families with a child aged between 4 and 13 years at baseline. Parents reported Observing and Nonreactivity at baseline using the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire and completed a computerized Go/No-Go task for assessing inhibitory control at baseline and 1-year follow-up. Families completed a series of in-home interaction tasks at baseline and 2-year follow-up, and effective parenting behaviors were observed and coded using a theory-driven, empirically validated coding system. Results showed that when fathers reported low Nonreactivity, the association between Observing and effective parenting behaviors 2 years later was negative, but this association became positive when fathers reported high Nonreactivity. Fathers’ Observing was associated with decreased inhibitory control 1 year later when they reported low (vs. high) Nonreactivity, whereas mothers’ Observing was associated with increased inhibitory control 1 year later when they reported high (vs. low) Nonreactivity. The hypothesized effect of inhibitory control as a mediator was not found. Understanding specificity in the effects of dispositional mindfulness dimensions on parenting behaviors will drive effective and efficient designs of mindful parenting interventions. Future research should use dismantling experimental designs to test the synergistic effects of Observing and Nonreactivity in parents. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)

6 Gender role reversal: Civilian husbands of U.S. military servicewomen as tied-migrant workers

Gender role reversal: Civilian husbands of U.S. military servicewomen as tied-migrant workers

APA Citation:

Dowling, L. E., Jackson, J. B., & Landers, A. L. (2024). Gender role reversal: Civilian husbands of U.S. military servicewomen as tied-migrant workers. Family Relations, 73(1), 441-465. https://doi.org/10.1111/fare.12936

Focus:

Mental health
Other

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches
Army
Marine Corps
Air Force
Navy

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Dowling, L. Emily; Jackson, Jeffrey B.; Landers, Ashley L.

Year: 2024

Abstract

Objective This qualitative study examined the experiences of male spouses of female service members in the U.S. military (civilian husbands of servicewomen) in their positions as tied-migrant workers. Background Employment of civilian husbands of servicewomen is frequently affected when they geographically relocate due to their wives' military service. Because societal norms for husbands as primary breadwinners in marriages persist and the majority of military couples consist of male service members married to female civilian spouses, civilian husbands of servicewomen may experience a gender role reversal in their identities as a spouse and as a provider within their relationships and military culture. Method Semistructured interviews were conducted with 22 civilian husbands who experienced at least one geographic relocation due to their wife's military service. Descriptive phenomenological analysis was used to discover the essence of participants' experiences. Results Themes around defining masculinity, minority experiences in the military, and nontraditional gender provider roles as tied-migrant workers emerged. Participants experienced a gender role reversal as tied-migrant workers and as military spouses, and they had some difficulties integrating into military communities. Participants expanded their masculine identities to include performing traditionally feminine tasks and valuing egalitarianism in their spousal relationships when they experienced barriers to breadwinning. Conclusion Findings indicated the importance of emotional support as civilian husbands navigate their masculine identities and relationships both with spouses and as gender minorities in their communities. Implications Clinical recommendations for psychotherapists are provided with an emphasis on using emotionally focused therapy with couples consisting of civilian husbands and servicewomen.

7 Qualitative examination of homecoming experiences among active-duty military fathers during reintegration

Qualitative examination of homecoming experiences among active-duty military fathers during reintegration

APA Citation:

Blankenship, A. E., Drew, A. L., Jacoby, V. M., Zolinski, S. K., Ojeda, A. R., Dondanville, K. A., Sharrieff, A.-F. M., … DeVoe, E. R. (2024). Qualitative examination of homecoming experiences among active-duty military fathers during reintegration. Qualitative Social Work, 23(2), 298-313. https://doi.org/10.1177/14733250221150378

Focus:

Deployment
Children
Couples

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty

Population:

Childhood (birth - 12 yrs)
Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Blankenship, Abby E.; Drew, Alison L.; Jacoby, Vanessa M.; Zolinski, Sophie K.; Ojeda, Alyssa R.; Dondanville, Katherine A.; Sharrieff, Allah-Fard M.; Yarvis, Jeffrey; Acker, Michelle; Blount, Tabatha H.; McGeary, Cindy A.; Young-McCaughan, Stacey; Peterson, Alan L.; Kritikos, Tessa K.; DeVoe, Ellen R.

Year: 2024

Abstract

Active-duty military fathers are frequently away from their families throughout their military career and are faced with readjusting to family and garrison life after each separation. For fathers of very young children, reintegration can have unique challenges due to the tremendous developmental progression occurring in early childhood and the impact of lengthy deployment separations. While much of the research on military families focuses on extreme negative experiences (e.g., reactions to war injuries and posttraumatic stress disorder), little is known about the common experiences of military families. This qualitative study explores the reintegration experiences of 15 active-duty U.S. Army fathers with a child under six in their home during the deployment. Homecoming experiences were coded and analyzed to distinguish four adjustment factors and five adaptation challenges. Most fathers described having mixed experiences during reintegration, with 93% referencing at least one factor making adjustment easier (e.g., communication with their spouse during deployment), and 80% referencing at least one factor making adjustment difficult (e.g., child?s initial hesitation or perceived rejection). Adjustment facilitators included: spending quality time with family, individual and family growth, quality communication during deployment, and the service member?s parental perspective taking. Challenges to adjustment included negative postdeployment reactions of children, difficulty readjusting to family and civilian life, and service member psychological changes. These findings expand our understanding of the reintegration experience of active-duty fathers with young children and identify common challenges and facilitators that can be addressed through culturally informed supportive services across the deployment cycle.

8 Facilitating United States service members’ transition out of the military: A self-determination theory perspective

Facilitating United States service members’ transition out of the military: A self-determination theory perspective

APA Citation:

Raabe, J., Eckenrod, M. R., Cooper, E., & Crain, J. A. (2024). Facilitating United States service members’ transition out of the military: A self-determination theory perspective. Journal of Career Development, 51(1), 40-59. https://doi.org/10.1177/08948453231198064

Focus:

Mental health
Veterans

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches
Army
Marine Corps
Navy

Military Affiliation:

Veteran

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Raabe, Johannes; Eckenrod, Morgan R.; Cooper, Emily; Crain, Jared A.

Year: 2024

Abstract

The purpose of the current qualitative research was to explore the role of veterans? basic psychological needs during the military transition. Using purposive and snowball sampling, 16 veterans (n = 13 male, n = 3 female; Mage = 38.3, SDage = 5.8 years) of the United States military (n = 8 Army, n = 4 Marine Corps, n = 3 Navy) were recruited to participate in semi-structured interviews. Reflexive thematic analysis of the qualitative data revealed seven themes: (a) veterans experienced different levels of relatedness in the military community during their transition, (b) perceptions of choice and control had varying influences on veterans? sense of autonomy during their transition, (c) veterans experienced a false sense of competence starting the transition, (d) figuring out how to transfer military experiences and skills to civilian jobs posed a meaningful challenge for veterans? sense of competence throughout the application process, (e) multiple factors helped veterans regain their sense of competence during the job search, (f) veterans experienced difficulties adjusting to new civilian job environment, and (g) family played a major role in fostering veterans? sense of autonomy during the transition. These findings offer multiple conceptual and practical implications, including the context-specificity of perceived competence and relatedness, challenge of skill transfer, and temporality of backup plans, that can be used to help service members? transition more effectively.

9 Emerging adult military-connected students express challenges transitioning into higher education: Implications for helping professionals

Emerging adult military-connected students express challenges transitioning into higher education: Implications for helping professionals

APA Citation:

Clary, K. L., & Byrne, L. (2023). Emerging adult military-connected students express challenges transitioning into higher education: Implications for helping professionals. Community College Journal of Research and Practice, 47(1), 22-37. https://doi.org/10.1080/10668926.2021.1925176

Focus:

Substance use
Other

Branch of Service:

Marine Corps
Navy
Air Force
Army

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty
Veteran
Guard

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Clary, Kelly Lynn; Byrne, Lucy

Year: 2023

Abstract

Emerging adult (EA; aged 18–29) military-connected students experience major developmental changes, often coupled with the transition into the civilian sector and higher education. This conglomeration may exacerbate anxiety, stress, and negative coping mechanisms, including substance use. Substance use rates are highest among EAs, across the lifespan. To our knowledge, limited research has looked at EA military-connected students’ transition into higher education during this developmental stage. We qualitatively interviewed 16 EA military-connected students who reported high-risk substance use behaviors. To our knowledge, no student veteran research study has considered this characteristic. This is important since military members are more likely to misuse substances and encounter related consequences than their civilian counterparts, and these developmental and transitional stressors put them at higher risk for misusing substances. In 74-minute interviews, we asked participants about (1) challenges transitioning into higher education and (2) techniques helping professionals should use to support EA military-connected students. Two coders employed Thematic Analysis to identify themes using NVivo. We found challenges include: (1) starting over, (2) unable to relate to others, (3) lacking a purpose or plan, (4) support system changes, and (5) people view you as only a veteran. EA military-connected students’ suggestions for helping professionals include: (1) use straightforward communication, (2) show a genuine interest, (3) offer guidance on creating a support system, and (4) treat me as a human, not only a veteran. This study provides translational examples for helping professionals such as encouraging involvement in military and veteran community organizations to promote a sense of belonging.

10 The impact of changes in family communication on sustained mental health symptom improvement in parents/caregivers following a military family intervention

The impact of changes in family communication on sustained mental health symptom improvement in parents/caregivers following a military family intervention

APA Citation:

Wasserman, M., Dodge, J., Barrera, W., Alaris, H., Woodward, K., & Lester, P. (2023). The impact of changes in family communication on sustained mental health symptom improvement in parents/caregivers following a military family intervention. Military Behavioral Health. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1080/21635781.2023.2221473

Focus:

Mental health
Parents
Programming

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches
Navy

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty

Population:

Preschool age (2 -5 yrs)
Adolescence (13 - 17 yrs)
Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Wasserman, Melissa; Dodge, Jessica; Barrera, Wendy; Alaris, Hilary; Woodward, Kristen; Lester, Patricia

Year: 2023

Abstract

A key mechanism of resilience, family communication, is examined in relationship to sustained improvement in parent/caregiver mental health. Service delivery data was utilized from parents/caregivers who participated in Families OverComing Under Stress. Data were analyzed for parents/caregivers indicating clinically meaningful symptoms of depression or anxiety at baseline and who completed measures of family communication each session and follow-up. Results found that family communication improvement from Baseline-Exit was significantly associated with sustained improvement in anxiety (p = .0223) and depression (p = .0349). Improvements in family communication may be critical in sustaining mental health symptom improvement among parents/caregivers.

11 Exploring the importance of predisposing, enabling, and need factors for promoting Veteran engagement in mental health therapy for post-traumatic stress: A multiple methods study

Exploring the importance of predisposing, enabling, and need factors for promoting Veteran engagement in mental health therapy for post-traumatic stress: A multiple methods study

APA Citation:

Shepherd-Banigan, M., Shapiro, A., Stechuchak, K. M., Sheahan, K. L., Ackland, P. E., Smith, V. A., …Van Houtven, C. H. (2023). Exploring the importance of predisposing, enabling, and need factors for promoting veteran engagement in mental health therapy for post-traumatic stress: A multiple methods study. BMC Psychiatry, 23, Article 372. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12888-023-04840-7

Focus:

Mental health
Veterans

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Veteran

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Shepherd-Banigan, Megan; Shapiro, Abigail; Stechuchak, Karen M.; Sheahan, Kate L.; Ackland, Princess E.; Smith, Valerie A.; Bokhour, Barbara G.; Glynn, Shirley M.; Calhoun, Patrick S.; Edelman, David; Weidenbacher, Hollis J.; Eldridge, Madeleine R.; Van Houtven, Courtney H.

Year: 2023

Abstract

This study explored Veteran and family member perspectives on factors that drive post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) therapy engagement within constructs of the Andersen model of behavioral health service utilization. Despite efforts by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to increase mental health care access, the proportion of Veterans with PTSD who engage in PTSD therapy remains low. Support for therapy from family members and friends could improve Veteran therapy use.

12 A qualitative study of military connected parents’ perceptions on establishing and maintaining child behavioral health services

A qualitative study of military connected parents’ perceptions on establishing and maintaining child behavioral health services

APA Citation:

Benson, J. L., Phillips, S., Perkins-Parks, S., & Crockett, J. (2023). A qualitative study of military connected parents’ perceptions on establishing and maintaining child behavioral health services. Military Behavioral Health. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1080/21635781.2023.2221474

Focus:

Parents
Children
Mental health

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty
Veteran

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)
Childhood (birth - 12 yrs)
School age (6 - 12 yrs)
Adolescence (13 - 17 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Benson, Jaime L.; Phillips, Sharon; Perkins-Parks, Susan; Crockett, Jennifer

Year: 2023

Abstract

Few studies have examined U.S. military parents’ perspectives in establishing, maintaining, and reestablishing child behavioral health services within the context of military life. This qualitative study focused on the experiences of military-connected parents raising children who were receiving non-psychiatric outpatient behavioral health services for a range of behavioral or emotional challenges. The purposes of the qualitative study were to understand parents’ perspectives on the unique challenges military families face while seeking treatment and to understand facilitators or barriers to treatment. Twenty-two parents across the branches of the U.S. military participated in semi-structured interviews. Data were analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Primary themes identified were difficulties reestablishing social and healthcare support networks when moving. When accessing behavioral health services, stigma, difficulty obtaining referrals, and family logistics were noted barriers. Facilitators included parental advocacy on behalf of their child and primary care providers providing quick referrals to specialized behavioral health services.

13 Resources and support for sexual assault survivors receiving services from the U.S. Air Force: What survivors say they need for recovery

Resources and support for sexual assault survivors receiving services from the U.S. Air Force: What survivors say they need for recovery

APA Citation:

Spencer, C. M., King, E. L., Foster, R. E., Vennum, A., & Stith, S. M. (2023). Resources and support for sexual assault survivors receiving services from the U.S. Air Force: What survivors say they need for recovery. Violence and Victims, 38(3), 414–434. https://doi.org/10.1891/VV-2021-0132

Focus:

Mental health
Trauma
Physical health

Branch of Service:

Air Force

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty
Reserve

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Spencer, Chelsea M.; King, Erika L.; Foster, Rachel E.; Vennum, Amber; Stith, Sandra M.

Year: 2023

Abstract

Sexual assault (SA) is a serious challenge faced by the U.S. military. Participants in this study included men and women who volunteered in response to a call for survivors of SA. Participants included active duty and reserve U.S. Air Force (USAF) members, spouses of service members, or civilian employees for the USAF (beneficiaries). The primary research question was, “if you could design the perfect response system to support survivors, what would be included in this system?” The research team conducted in-depth interviews with nine survivors. Next, 82 survivors completed a survey agreeing or disagreeing with strategies identified by interview participants to improve services for survivors and offered additional suggestions. Analysis revealed survivor recommendations to improve SA services.

14 The military spouse experience of living alongside their serving/veteran partner with a mental health issue: A systematic review and narrative synthesis

The military spouse experience of living alongside their serving/veteran partner with a mental health issue: A systematic review and narrative synthesis

APA Citation:

Senior, E., Clarke, A., & Wilson-Menzfeld, G. (2023). The military spouse experience of living alongside their serving/veteran partner with a mental health issue: A systematic review and narrative synthesis. PLOS ONE, 18(5), Article e0285714. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0285714

Focus:

Couples
Veterans
Mental health

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches
International Military

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty
Veteran

Population:

Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Senior, Emma; Clarke, Amanda; Wilson-Menzfeld, Gemma

Year: 2023

Abstract

Introduction Military healthcare studies have reported a wide range of mental health issues amongst military personnel. Globally, mental health issues are one of the main causes of ill health. Military personnel have a greater prevalence of mental health issues than that of the general population. The impact of mental health issues can be wide and far reaching for family and carers. This systematic narrative review explores the military spouse experience of living alongside their serving or veteran partner with a mental health issue. Methods The systematic review performed was based on the PRISMA guide for searching, screening, selecting papers for data extraction and evaluation. Studies were identified from CINHAL, ASSIA, Proquest Psychology, Proquest Nursing & Allied Health source, Proquest Dissertations & Theses, ETHOS, PsychArticles, Hospital collection, Medline, Science Direct Freedom Collection and hand searching of citations and reference lists. Results Twenty-seven studies were included in the narrative synthesis. Five overarching themes from the experiences of military spouses’ living alongside their serving/veteran partners mental health issue were identified: caregiver burden, intimate relationships, psychological/psychosocial effects on the spouse, mental health service provision and spouse’s knowledge and management of symptoms. Conclusions The systematic review and narrative synthesis identified that the majority of studies focused on spouses of veterans, very few were specific to serving military personnel, but similarities were noted. Findings suggest that care burden and a negative impact on the intimate relationship is evident, therefore highlight a need to support and protect the military spouse and their serving partner. Likewise, there is a need for greater knowledge, access and inclusion of the military spouse, in the care and treatment provision of their serving partner’s mental health issue.

15 Unmet needs and coping strategies of older underserved veterans during the COVID-19 pandemic

Unmet needs and coping strategies of older underserved veterans during the COVID-19 pandemic

APA Citation:

Haltom, T. M., Tiong, J., Evans, T. L., Kamdar, N., True, G., & Kunik, M. E. (2023). Unmet needs and coping strategies of older underserved veterans during the COVID-19 pandemic. Journal of Primary Care & Community Health, 14. https://doi.org/10.1177/21501319231184368

Focus:

Veterans
Physical health

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Veteran

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)
Aged (65 yrs & older)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Haltom, Trenton M.; Tiong, Joyce; Evans, Tracy L.; Kamdar, Nipa; True, Gala; Kunik, Mark E.

Year: 2023

Abstract

Introduction: The COVID-19 pandemic has had profound impacts on people with diabetes, a group with high morbidity and mortality. Factors like race, age, income, Veteran-status, and limited or interrupted resources early in the COVID-19 pandemic compounded risks for negative health outcomes. Our objective was to characterize the experiences and needs of under-resourced Veterans with type 2 diabetes during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: We conducted semi-structured qualitative interviews (March through September 2021) with U.S. military Veterans with diabetes. Transcripts were analyzed using a team-based, iterative process of summarizing and coding to identify key themes. Participants included Veterans (n = 25) who were mostly men (84%), Black or African American (76%), older (mean age = 62.6), and low-income (<$20 000/year; 56%). Most participants self-reported moderate (36%) or severe (56%) diabetes-related distress. Results: Shutdowns and social distancing negatively impacted Veterans’ social, mental, and physical health. Veterans reported feeling increased isolation, depression, stress, and unmet mental health needs. Their physical health was also negatively affected. Despite pandemic-related challenges, Veterans adapted with new technological skills, appreciating their families, staying active, and relying on their religious faith. Conclusions: Veterans’ experiences during the pandemic revealed the importance of social support and access to technology. For those without social support, peer support could protect against negative health outcomes. Emergency-preparedness efforts for vulnerable patients with type 2 diabetes should include raising awareness about and increasing access to technological resources (eg, Zoom or telehealth platforms). Findings from this study will help tailor support programs for specific populations’ needs in future health crises.

16 Exploring the role of moral injury outcomes in intimate relationship functioning among U.S. combat veterans

Exploring the role of moral injury outcomes in intimate relationship functioning among U.S. combat veterans

APA Citation:

Fernandez, P. E., & Currier, J. M. (2023). Exploring the role of moral injury outcomes in intimate relationship functioning among U.S. combat veterans. Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1037/tra0001553

Focus:

Veterans
Mental health
Couples

Branch of Service:

Army
Marine Corps
Navy
Air Force
Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Veteran

Population:

Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Fernandez, Paola Estefania; Currier, Joseph M.

Year: 2023

Abstract

Objective: Moral injury entails psychological, social, and possible spiritual issues that might interfere with veterans’ functioning in romantic or intimate relationships. To date, research has not examined the contribution of moral injury outcomes in this core functional domain in many veterans’ lives. Method: In total, 65 combat veterans who were engaging in a peer-led intervention for moral injury in a Veteran Service Organization completed the Expressions of Moral Injury Scale, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) checklist for DSM-5, and the romantic relationship subscale of the Inventory of Psychosocial Functioning Scale. Results: Bivariate analyses revealed that moral injury and PTSD symptoms were each associated with worse relationship functioning among the veterans. When including moral injury and PTSD symptoms as predictors in a multivariate analysis, only moral injury was uniquely linked with poorer relationship functioning. Conclusions: Overall, these findings suggest that moral injury could play a pernicious role in many veterans’ issues in relationship problems with their spouses or partners. Future research needs to examine the potential utility of addressing moral injury among veterans who are struggling to meet demands for intimacy and connection in their intimate or romantic relationships. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)

17 Who supports the troops? Social support domains and sources in active duty Army networks

Who supports the troops? Social support domains and sources in active duty Army networks

APA Citation:

Barr, N., Petry, L., Fulginiti, A., Arora, A., Cederbaum, J., Castro, C., & Rice, E. (2023). Who supports the troops? Social support domains and sources in active duty Army networks. Armed Forces & Society. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1177/0095327X231182907

Focus:

Physical health
Mental health
Other

Branch of Service:

Army

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Barr, Nicholas; Petry, Laura; Fulginiti, Anthony; Arora, Anil; Cederbaum, Julie; Castro, Carl; Rice, Eric

Year: 2023

Abstract

Social support is a critical determinant of military service members’ mental and behavioral health outcomes, but few studies have investigated social support types and sources in the mixed family and military social networks in which service members are embedded. We applied multilevel logistic regression modeling to investigate links between active-duty Army Soldiers’ individual demographic and military characteristics, relational characteristics, and social support outcomes, in sample of 241 active-duty U.S. Army personnel. Results showed that participants who rated unit cohesion higher were more likely to report receiving informational, emotional, and mental health help-seeking support. Participants were more likely to receive informational, emotional, and help-seeking support from a romantic partner or deployment buddy than a relative and less likely to receive help-seeking support from males than females. Findings highlight the critical importance of both unit level and external relationships in meeting Soldiers’ social support needs.

18 Biracial identity in adult military children

Biracial identity in adult military children

APA Citation:

Williams, C., Guillaume, R. O., & Zamora, R. C. (2023). Biracial identity in adult military children. Identity, 23(4), 361-378. https://doi.org/10.1080/15283488.2023.2238208

Focus:

Other

Branch of Service:

Army
Air Force
Navy
Marine Corps
Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Veteran

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)
Aged (65 yrs & older)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Williams, Charlotte; Guillaume, Rene O.; Zamora, Richard C.

Year: 2023

Abstract

This study sought to explore adult biracial individuals and their perceived racial identities and their own military dependent identities in military communities. Utilizing a social constructivist grounded theory methodology, the study participants consisted of 21 Black/White self-identifying biracial former military dependent children. Results show a core category, and two key categories were discovered from the analysis. The core category indicated that biopsychosocial and ecological factors across time influence biracial military identity development. These individuals have an intersecting and outsider identity that influences their community identity. The participants used different coping behaviors to ecological stressors they experienced that shaped their identity. The implications and recommendations for practice, training, and future research are discussed for this study.

19 Incidence and prevalence of eating disorders among active duty US military-dependent youth from 2016 to 2021

Incidence and prevalence of eating disorders among active duty US military-dependent youth from 2016 to 2021

APA Citation:

Thompson, K. A., Bauman, V., Sunderland, K. W., Thornton, J. A., Schvey, N. A., Moyer, R., Sekyere, N. A., Funk, W., Pav, V., Brydum, R., Klein, D. A., Lavender, J. M., & Tanofsky-Kraff, M. (2023). Incidence and prevalence of eating disorders among active duty US military-dependent youth from 2016 to 2021. International Journal of Eating Disorders, 56(10), 1973-1982. https://doi.org/10.1002/eat.24025

Focus:

Physical health
Mental health
Youth

Branch of Service:

Air Force
Army
Coast Guard
Marine Corps
Navy
Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty
Guard

Population:

School age (6 - 12 yrs)
Adolescence (13 - 17 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Thompson, Katherine A.; Bauman, Vivian; Sunderland, Kevin W.; Thornton, Jennifer A.; Schvey, Natasha A.; Moyer, Rachel; Sekyere, Nana Amma; Funk, Wendy; Pav, Veronika; Brydum, Rick; Klein, David A.; Lavender, Jason M.; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian

Year: 2023

Abstract

Objective The offspring of US military service members may be at increased risk for eating disorders. However, no epidemiological studies to date have evaluated eating disorder incidence rates and prevalence estimates among military-dependent youth. Method This retrospective cohort study examined eating disorder diagnoses in the military healthcare system (MHS) from 2016 through 2021. Active duty and national guard military-dependent youth, aged 10–17 years, who received care in the MHS via TRICARE Prime insurance, were identified by one or more ICD-10 codes indicative of an eating disorder diagnosis (anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, binge-eating disorder, and other-specified eating disorders). Results During the 6-year surveillance period, 2534 dependents received incident diagnoses of eating disorders, with a crude overall incidence rate of 1.75 cases per 10,000 person-years. The most common diagnosis was other-specified eating disorder, followed by anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge-eating disorder. The crude annual incidence rate of all eating disorder diagnoses increased by nearly 65% from 2016 to 2021. Rates for all diagnoses were highest in 2020 and 2021. Period prevalence estimates were .08% for any eating disorder diagnosis, .01% for anorexia nervosa, .004% for bulimia nervosa, .004% for binge-eating disorder, and .06% for other-specified eating disorders. Discussion The observed increase in eating disorder diagnoses during the surveillance period appeared to be driven by female dependents. More military dependents experienced a new-onset diagnosis during the COVID-19 pandemic compared to previous years. These findings highlight the need for eating disorder screening, identification, and treatment for dependents within the MHS. Public Significance Statement Children of US military service members may be at increased risk for eating disorders. Results indicate new-onset eating disorder cases increased 65% from 2016 to 2021, primarily among girls compared to boys. The most diagnosed and fastest growing diagnosis was other-specified eating disorder. Rates of anorexia nervosa increased following the COVID-19 pandemic. Findings highlight the need for eating disorder screening, identification, and treatment within the military healthcare system.

20 Women veterans’ experiences discussing household firearms with their intimate partners: Collaborative, devalued, and deferential relational types

Women veterans’ experiences discussing household firearms with their intimate partners: Collaborative, devalued, and deferential relational types

APA Citation:

Polzer, E. R., Rohs, C. M., Thomas, S. M., Holliday, R., Miller, C. N., Simonetti, J. A., Iverson, K. M., Brenner, L. A., & Monteith, L. L. (2023). Women veterans’ experiences discussing household firearms with their intimate partners: Collaborative, devalued, and deferential relational types. Injury Epidemiology, 10(1), Article 39. https://doi.org/10.1186/s40621-023-00452-7

Focus:

Veterans
Couples

Branch of Service:

Army
Air Force
Navy
Marine Corps
Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Veteran

Population:

Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)
Aged (65 yrs & older)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Polzer, Evan R.; Rohs, Carly M.; Thomas, Suzanne M.; Holliday, Ryan; Miller, Christin N.; Simonetti, Joseph A.; Iverson, Katherine M.; Brenner, Lisa A.; Monteith, Lindsey L.

Year: 2023

Abstract

Rates of firearm suicide have increased among women Veterans. Discussing firearm access and reducing access to lethal means of suicide when suicide risk is heightened are central tenets of suicide prevention, as is tailoring suicide prevention strategies to specific populations. While research has begun to explore how to optimize firearm lethal means safety counseling with women Veterans, there is limited knowledge of women Veterans' perspectives on including their intimate partners in such efforts. This gap is notable since many women Veterans have access to firearms owned by other household members. Understanding women Veterans’ experiences and perspectives regarding including their partners in firearm lethal means safety conversations can provide important information for tailoring firearm lethal means safety counseling for women Veterans.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Last

Showing dictionary results for:

The degree to which data are stable. This term, from Lincoln and Guba (1985), is often preferred by interpretivists to the term

Category: Methodology

An interaction occurs when an independent variable has a different effect on the outcome depending on the values of another independent variable

Category: Methodology

"An umbrella term for people whose gender identity and/or gender expression differs from what is typically associated with the sex they were assigned at birth. People under the transgender umbrella may describe their gender identity using one or more of a wide variety of terms – including but not limited to transgender. The term “trans” is often used as shorthand. "

Category: Demographic Characteristics

Related Terms:

4 Gay

"A term used to describe a man who is attracted to another man; this term may also be used by women attracted to another woman. "

Category: Demographic Characteristics

Related Terms:

A document prepared by the evaluation client specifying the objectives, contents, organization, and timeline for the evaluation and defining the scope of work and responsibilities for the evaluation consultant(s).

Category: Methodology

6 Purple

“A term indicating that an activity or a program includes all branches of the U.S. Armed Forces.”

Category: Military

7 Post

“The Army term for a military installation.”

Category: Military

Related Terms:

Showing monthly topics for:

This website uses cookies to improve the browsing experience of our users. Please review Auburn University’s Privacy Statement for more information. Accept & Close