(334) 844-3299
MilitaryREACH@auburn.edu
Search Results
Make a new Search
Search in Library (1540) Results

Library (1540)

Dictionary (632)

Research in Action (81)

News (55)

Showing library results for: ALL

Filters: Research Summary

1 - 20 of 1540

1 PTSD and parental functioning: The protective role of neighborhood cohesion among black and white veterans

PTSD and parental functioning: The protective role of neighborhood cohesion among black and white veterans

APA Citation:

Franz, M. R., Sanders, W., Nillni, Y. I., Vogt, D., Matteo, R., & Galovski, T. (2022). PTSD and parental functioning: The protective role of neighborhood cohesion among Black and White veterans. Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy, 14(S1), S4-S12. https://doi.org/10.1037/tra0001123

Focus:

Parents
Trauma
Veterans

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Veteran

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Franz, Molly R.; Sanders, Wesley; Nillni, Yael I.; Vogt, Dawne; Matteo, Rebecca; Galovski, Tara

Year: 2022

Abstract

Objective: Caregivers with a history of trauma exposure may struggle to parent effectively, particularly when symptoms of PTSD are prominent. Consequently, identifying factors that buffer associations between PTSD and poor parental functioning is critical to help trauma-exposed families thrive. One important source of resilience may spring from being part of a socially cohesive neighborhood that offers positive social connections and resources. The purpose of this study was to examine whether greater neighborhood cohesion buffers associations between PTSD and perceived parental functioning. Method: A diverse national sample of 563 Black and White veterans raising children in single or dual parent households completed questionnaires assessing PTSD symptoms and neighborhood cohesion at baseline, as well as parental functioning four months later. Results: Multigroup moderation analyses that controlled for crime index, income, and sex revealed that among single Black veterans, but not other groups, the relationship between higher PTSD and poorer parental functioning was weakened for veterans who reported higher neighborhood cohesion. Conclusions: Findings suggest that PTSD symptoms and neighborhood cohesion affect parenting differently across racial and family makeup configurations, and that higher neighborhood cohesion might be particularly useful in buffering the association between PTSD and parenting among single Black veterans. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)

2 Military couples' experiences in the aftermath of a cancelled deployment

Military couples' experiences in the aftermath of a cancelled deployment

APA Citation:

Marini, C. M., Basinger, E. D., Monk, J. K., McCall, C. E., & MacDermid Wadsworth, S. M. (2022). Military couples’ experiences in the aftermath of a cancelled deployment. Family Process. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1111/famp.12747

Focus:

Couples
Deployment

Branch of Service:

Army

Military Affiliation:

Guard

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Marini, Christina M.; Basinger, Erin D.; Monk, James K.; McCall, Christine E.; MacDermid Wadsworth, Shelley M.

Year: 2022

Abstract

Deployment requires considerable preparation for military families and changes to these plans may create notable stress. The current study leveraged data from a sample of military couples who experienced the cancellation of an overseas deployment to learn more about their experiences as they adjusted to this change. Guided by family stress and anticipatory stress perspectives, we analyzed qualitative data from 28 service members and their significant others (i.e., spouses or cohabitating partners) to understand their overall reactions to the deployment cancellation. We identified three overall reactions (positive, negative, and ambivalent) that were based on participants' appraisals of-and preparations for-deployment, as well as ambiguity about family roles and relationships. Further, participants across groups experienced uncertainty about whether or not the deployment would occur, and altered timelines for other life events. Together, our findings highlight the post-cancellation period as a significant time of stress and transition for military families. However, our findings also signify the need to help all military families cope with uncertainty about when or if deployments will occur given that the military's priorities are often in flux. We therefore describe coping efforts that may be particularly adaptive for families to engage in as they prepare for uncertain, anticipated stressors.

3 Defeated no more: Meaning-making after military sexual trauma

Defeated no more: Meaning-making after military sexual trauma

APA Citation:

Preston, A. M., Saigal, S., Barrie, R., McKinney, H., Mooney, S., & Padala, P. R. (2022). Defeated no more: Meaning-making after military sexual trauma. Military Medicine, usab528. https://doi.org/10.1093/milmed/usab528

Focus:

Trauma
Veterans

Branch of Service:

Army
Navy
Marine Corps
Air Force
Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Veteran

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Preston, A’mie M.; Saigal, Seema; Barrie, Rabiatu; McKinney, Hannah; Mooney, Scott; Padala, Prasad R.

Year: 2022

Abstract

Military sexual trauma (MST) has been a concern within our U.S. military for many years. Many interventions have been found to benefit this population, although meaning-based interventions are still lacking in this area. The purpose of this phenomenological study is to understand the meaning-making process and themes that arise for female military veterans as they narrate their experience(s) of MST.The qualitative study consisted of six female participants, from different areas across the nation, who all reported experiencing MST during their time in service. Their experiences of MST included both sexual harassment and sexual assault. Participants completed a semi-structured interview that was analyzed using an axial coding method to discover the major themes of each participant’s interview. The participants discussed the positive and negative aspects of their journey following their MST experience(s). This study’s procedures were approved by Adler University’s Institutional Review Board.Many found the interview to be a healing experience on their path of post-traumatic growth (PTG). There were eight major themes that arose from the data analysis under the three main domains of (1) creating a work or doing a deed, (2) experiencing something or encountering someone in a way to produce PTG, and (3) altering one’s attitude toward unavoidable suffering. The eight themes were as follows: advocacy, adaptive coping, sense of family unit, psychological clarity, meaningful mantra, survivor mentality code, view of self in the world, and resiliency.All participants endorsed engagement in some type of activity that fell into one of the three major domains identified above. This finding helped highlight the PTG that participants were able to experience through their meaning-making journey. There were several recommendations and study implications that were derived from this research study. With the themes introduced from this study, future treatment planning for individual survivors of MST can be better informed by the utilization of meaning-making techniques. Family and group meaning-based interventions would also be an area of continued exploration for this population. Future implications for practice are also included within this article. Significant limitations of the study include amount of participants, lack of diversity in sample population, qualitative study results, and lack of a more-personal interviewing process.

4 Family planning in the U.S. military: The gendered experiences of servicewomen

Family planning in the U.S. military: The gendered experiences of servicewomen

APA Citation:

Erwin, S. K. (2022). Family planning in the U.S. military: The gendered experiences of servicewomen. Journal of Military, Veteran and Family Health, 8(1), 102-109. https://doi.org/10.3138/jmvfh-2021-0015

Focus:

Children
Couples
Parents
Other

Branch of Service:

Air Force
Army
Marine Corps
Navy
Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Erwin, Stephanie K.

Year: 2022

Abstract

LAY SUMMARY Balancing family and work is always challenging for working women; however, military service presents especially nuanced and unique challenges to women serving in the U.S. military. Family planning, and in particular marriage and children, have distinct impacts on servicewomen’s professional careers. Their chosen professions often intersect and detract from their family planning choices. Within a larger study of gendered experiences, women from all four branches of the U.S. military, representing a variety of familial statuses and occupations, noted the complex and challenging intersections of family and work they encountered over the course of their military careers. As in other professions, military women bear disproportionate familial burdens compared with their male counterparts, and challenges pertaining to marriage and children regularly affect their professional careers. However, the military presents heightened professional demands on family planning, including marital status, marital partners’ professions, pregnancy, maternity, and parenthood. These additional challenges women in the military face regarding family planning often run counter to organizational efforts to encourage women’s participation, promotion, and retention in the military.

5 Exploring the advocacy experiences of military families with children who have disabilities

Exploring the advocacy experiences of military families with children who have disabilities

APA Citation:

Aleman-Tovar, J., Schraml-Block, K., DiPietro-Wells, R., & Burke, M. (2022). Exploring the advocacy experiences of military families with children who have disabilities. Journal of Child and Family Studies, 31(3), 843 – 853. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10826-021-02161-5

Focus:

Children
Parents

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty

Population:

School age (6 - 12 yrs)
Adolescence (13 - 17 yrs)
Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Aleman-Tovar, Janeth; Schraml-Block, Kristen; DiPietro-Wells, Robyn; Burke, Meghan

Year: 2022

Abstract

When children with disabilities receive appropriate services, they experience long-term developmental benefits. Yet, military families of children with disabilities in the United States report lacking access to needed services and having difficulty navigating service delivery systems. Unlike civilian families, military families face added stressors such as deployment and relocation. Parent advocacy may be critical for military families of children with disabilities to access needed services. However, little research has explored advocacy among military families. The purpose of this exploratory study was to examine the advocacy experiences of military families of children with disabilities. Using a snowballing sampling, we conducted individual interviews with 11 military parents of children with disabilities from five states. Participants reported unique military experiences (e.g., satisfaction with the coverage of their healthcare program but had difficulty navigating healthcare policies), barriers to advocacy (e.g., limited school resources), and facilitators to advocacy (e.g., perseverance and resilience). Based on the findings, implications for practice and research are discussed.

6 Financial status and well-being in recently separated military veterans

Financial status and well-being in recently separated military veterans

APA Citation:

Elbogen, E. B., Zeber, J. E., Vogt, D., Perkins, D. F., Finley, E. P., & Copeland, L. A. (2022). Financial status and well-being in recently separated military veterans. Military Medicine, usac030. https://doi.org/10.1093/milmed/usac030

Focus:

Veterans
Mental health
Physical health
Other

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches
Army
Navy
Air Force
Marine Corps

Military Affiliation:

Veteran

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)
Aged (65 yrs & older)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Elbogen, Eric B.; Zeber, John E.; Vogt, Dawne; Perkins, Daniel F.; Finley, Erin P.; Copeland, Laurel A.

Year: 2022

Abstract

Introduction Veterans transitioning from military service to civilian life manage numerous changes simultaneously, in health, employment, social relationships, and finances. Financial problems may impact financial well-being as well as adjustment to civilian life in general; yet, research on Veterans’ financial challenges remains limited. This study examined six indicators of perceived financial status among newly transitioned Veterans over a period of 3 years and then examined perceived financial well-being measured in two domains—satisfaction and functioning—and difficulty adjusting to civilian life as functions of financial status. Materials and Methods A sample representing 48,965 Veterans who separated from active duty/activated status in fall 2016 provided informed consent and survey data over their first 33 post-military months; data were analyzed in weighted regression models that included demographics, military characteristics, social support, resilience, life stress, and indicators of financial status. Results Financial status immediately post-separation included having stable housing (88%), being able to pay for necessities (83%), keeping up with creditors (88%), having insurance for catastrophic events such as disability (79%), saving for retirement (62%), and setting aside 3 months of salary (50%). Thirteen percent of Veterans disclosed troubled financial status, having achieved no more than two of these financial goals; 38% had moderate and 49% excellent financial status. Troubled or moderate financial status, Black race, enlisted, and higher levels of stress predicted lower financial functioning. Older age, college degree at baseline, employment, and social support predicted better financial satisfaction. Veterans with troubled financial status reported greater difficulty adjusting to civilian life (odds ratio 1.34); women were less likely to report difficulty adjusting to civilian life (odds ratio 0.85). Conclusions Findings indicate that financial satisfaction and functioning may be sensitive to psychosocial factors (social support and stress). Findings also underscore the value of assessing Veterans’ financial status (poor debt management and lack of future planning), providing encouragement and assistance to pursue a college degree, and improving household financial management, thus increasing the likelihood that Veterans will have the necessary tools to manage their finances after separation and achieve whole health well-being.

7 Postdeployment mental health concerns and family functioning in veteran men and women

Postdeployment mental health concerns and family functioning in veteran men and women

APA Citation:

Zelkowitz, R. L., Archibald, E. A., Gradus, J. L., & Street, A. E. (2022). Postdeployment mental health concerns and family functioning in veteran men and women. Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1037/tra0001237

Focus:

Deployment
Mental health
Veterans
Parents
Trauma
Youth

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Veteran

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)
Aged (65 yrs & older)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Zelkowitz, Rachel L.; Archibald, Emma A.; Gradus, Jaimie L.; Street, Amy E.

Year: 2022

Abstract

Objective: Despite growing numbers of veteran women, it is unclear whether the impact of common postdeployment mental health concerns on key aspects of family functioning varies by gender. We examined whether associations between PTSD, depression, and problematic alcohol use and intimate relationship quality and parenting self-efficacy differed among men and women in a large, gender-balanced sample of post-9/11 veterans. Method: Participants included 2,348 veterans (51.49% women) of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan who were part of a larger study of gender differences in effects of wartime deployment. Veterans who were married or in a relationship (n = 1,536, 49.09% women) reported overall relationship quality. Veterans with children under age 18 (n = 1,049; 51.57% women) self-reported on their sense of efficacy as parents. All participants reported symptoms of PTSD, depression, and problematic alcohol use. We used a series of hierarchical linear regressions to test gender as a moderator of each postdeployment mental health concern and the family functioning constructs of interest. Results: Each postdeployment mental health concern was associated with reduced relationship quality and parenting self-efficacy, and these associations were largely consistent across gender. However, links between reduced parenting self-efficacy and increased PTSD and depressive symptoms were stronger in women compared with men. Conclusions: Postdeployment mental health concerns are associated with impairment in key family relationships for both veteran men and women. This impact may be particularly profound for parenting self-efficacy among female veterans, highlighting the potential importance of targeted interventions in this domain. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

8 Some parents survive and some don't: The Army and the family as “greedy institutions”

Some parents survive and some don't: The Army and the family as “greedy institutions”

APA Citation:

Strader, E. & Smith, M. (2022). Some parents survive and some don't: The Army and the family as "greedy institutions". Public Administration Review, 82(3), 446-458. https://doi.org/10.1111/puar.13467

Focus:

Parents
Other

Branch of Service:

Army

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty

Population:

Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Strader, Eiko; Smith, Capt Margaret

Year: 2022

Abstract

The military and the family are “greedy institutions” that require the full attention of their members. Being aware of the tension between work and family, the United States military has developed family support policies that are more generous than legally required to ensure personnel readiness. However, family formation remains a major obstacle for recruitment, retention, and integration of women. Using administrative data, this research shows that fathers were more likely to leave prematurely for family reasons than childless men, particularly among non-Hispanic Black and American Indian/Alaska Native men. However, women who gave birth while in service were much less likely to leave for work-family reasons than childless women, while the same could not be said for women who joined as mothers and had no additional children. The results reflect the gendered logic of the organization and the narrow conceptualization of work–family conflict, both of which perpetuate gender-role stereotypes.

9 Adverse childhood experiences, mental health, and relationship satisfaction in military couples

Adverse childhood experiences, mental health, and relationship satisfaction in military couples

APA Citation:

Khalifian, C. E., Bosch, J., Knopp, K., Delay, C., Sohn, M. J., & Morland, L. A. (2022). Adverse childhood experiences, mental health, and relationship satisfaction in military couples. Journal of Family Psychology, 36(4), 630-635. https://doi.org/10.1037/fam0000952

Focus:

Mental health
Trauma
Couples
Veterans

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches
Army
Navy
Air Force
Marine Corps

Military Affiliation:

Veteran

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Khalifian, Chandra E.; Bosch, Jeane; Knopp, Kayla; Delay, Christophe; Sohn, Min Ji; Morland, Leslie A.

Year: 2022

Abstract

Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) have been found to influence one’s own mental health and relationship satisfaction in adulthood; however, the association between one’s own ACEs and their partner’s individual and relationship functioning has not been explored. Veterans (n = 103) and their significant others (S-O; total N = 206) completed assessments on ACEs, depression, relationship satisfaction, and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) symptom severity as part of a baseline assessment in a treatment outcome study for veterans with PTSD and their S-Os. Actor Partner Interdependence Moderation Modeling (APIMoM) was conducted. Higher ACE score was positively related to PTSD for all participants. Female S-O’s ACE score was positively related to their own depression, and male S-Os reported higher depression and lower relationship satisfaction when their partners reported a higher ACE score. Surprisingly, female veterans experienced higher relationship satisfaction when their S-Os reported a higher ACE score. ACEs are related differently to one’s own and one’s partner’s mental health and relationship satisfaction and should be assessed when conducting couple’s interventions. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

10 Examination of the interaction between parental military-status and race among non-Hispanic Black and non-Hispanic White adolescents with overweight/obesity

Examination of the interaction between parental military-status and race among non-Hispanic Black and non-Hispanic White adolescents with overweight/obesity

APA Citation:

Higgins Neyland, M. K., Shank, L. M., Lavender, J. M., Burke, N. L., Rice, A., Gallagher-Teske, J... Tanofsky-Kraff, M. (2022). Examination of the interaction between parental military-status and race among non-Hispanic Black and non-Hispanic White adolescents with overweight/obesity. Journal of Pediatric Psychology, jsac008. https://doi.org/10.1093/jpepsy/jsac008

Focus:

Physical health
Children
Mental health
Youth

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty
Veteran

Population:

School age (6 - 12 yrs)
Adolescence (13 - 17 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Higgins Neyland, M. K.; Shank, Lisa M.; Lavender, Jason M.; Burke, Natasha L.; Rice, Alexander; Gallagher-Teske, Julia; Markos, Bethelhem; Faulkner, Loie M.; Djan, Kweku G.; Kwarteng, Esther A.; LeMay-Russell, Sarah; Parker, Megan N.; Schvey, Natasha A.; Sbrocco, Tracy; Wilfley, Denise E.; Ford, Brian; Ford, Caitlin; Haigney, Mark; Klein, David A.; Olsen, Cara H.; Quinlan, Jeffrey; Jorgensen, Sarah; Brady, Sheila; Shomaker, Lauren B.; Yanovski, Jack A.; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian

Year: 2022

Abstract

Adolescent military-dependents experience distinct risk and protective factors, which may necessitate additional clinical considerations. In civilian youth, overweight/obesity is associated with eating, internalizing, and externalizing difficulties, with some studies reporting more difficulties among non-Hispanic White (vs. non-Hispanic Black) youth. It is unknown if these disparities exist among adolescent military-dependents, or between civilian and military-dependent youth. Non-Hispanic Black (187 civilian, 38 military-dependent) and non-Hispanic White (205 civilian, 84 military-dependent) adolescents with overweight/obesity (14.7 ± 1.6 years; 73.9% girls; body mass index adjusted for age and sex 1.9 ± 0.5) completed a disordered-eating interview; parents completed a measure assessing their child’s internalizing and externalizing difficulties. Multiple linear regressions examined parental military-status as a moderator of the relationship of participant race with eating, internalizing, and externalizing difficulties.  White civilian youth with overweight/obesity reported significantly greater disordered-eating than their Black peers (p < .001); there were no other significant racial differences. In all regressions, parental military-status significantly moderated the association between race and each dependent variable (ps < .047). Black military-dependents (vs. civilians) reported more disordered-eating and internalizing difficulties (ps = .01). White military-dependents (vs. civilians) reported fewer externalizing difficulties (p = .01). Black adolescent military-dependents with overweight/obesity may experience more eating and internalizing difficulties (vs. civilians), a pattern not observed among White participants. Future work should examine if being a military-dependent and a historically marginalized racial group member accounts for these findings. Such data may inform providers of youth with intersecting minority identities.

11 VA family service access and utilization in a national sample of veterans

VA family service access and utilization in a national sample of veterans

APA Citation:

McKee, G. B., Knopp, K., Glynn, S. M., & McDonald, S. D. (2022). VA family service access and utilization in a national sample of veterans. Psychological Services. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1037/ser0000626

Focus:

Veterans
Mental health
Other

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Veteran

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)
Aged (65 yrs & older)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: McKee, Grace B.; Knopp, Kayla; Glynn, Shirley M.; McDonald, Scott D.

Year: 2022

Abstract

Relationship and family difficulties are common experiences for military veterans, who are able to access family services (i.e., couple and family therapy) through the Veterans Affairs (VA) Healthcare System. This study examines demographic, mental health, military, and referral source variables associated with referral to and utilization of family services using a large national VA dataset of 22,969 veterans who were referred to couple or family therapy from 2016 to 2019. Of those referred, 44.39% had a completed referral; among those who initiated therapy, 31.11% attended five or more sessions. Logistic regression was used to evaluate predictors of completed referrals and of attending five or more sessions of couple or family therapy. Veterans identifying as Black/African American, American Indian or Alaska Native were less likely to have a completed referral than non-Hispanic White veterans; moreover, veterans identifying as Black/African American or Hispanic were less likely to attend five or more sessions. Lower likelihood of a completed referral was also associated with rural county residence, being separated, post-9/11 service era, a substance use disorder diagnosis, and being referred by a psychiatrist, neurologist, physician, or nursing staff rather than a psychologist. Lower likelihood of attending five or more sessions was associated with a delay of 22 or more days to intake, an adjustment disorder diagnosis, and being referred from VA specialty care, or by a psychiatrist or neurologist. These findings may help inform efforts for outreach and service retention within VA family services in order to ensure equity in access to care and healthcare utilization. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

12 Military and nonmilitary stressors associated with mental health outcomes among female military spouses

Military and nonmilitary stressors associated with mental health outcomes among female military spouses

APA Citation:

Sullivan, K. S., Park, Y., & Riviere, L. A. (2022). Military and nonmilitary stressors associated with mental health outcomes among female military spouses. Family Relations, 71(1), 371-388. https://doi.org/10.1111/fare.12589

Focus:

Mental health

Branch of Service:

Army

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Sullivan, Kathrine S.; Park, Yangjin; Riviere, Lyndon A.

Year: 2022

Abstract

Objective This study uses a stress process framework and person-centered methods to describe patterns of concurrent stressors across multiple domains and to associate patterns with female military spouse mental health. Background Most military families are resilient. However, a subset of military spouses experiences adverse outcomes in the context of war-related stress. To date, a focus on military-specific stressors has largely obscured the effects of stress unrelated to military service on the well-being of military spouses. Methods Data were drawn from a 2012 survey of 343 U.S. Army spouses, measuring intrapersonal (e.g., adverse childhood experiences), family (e.g., work–family conflict), and military stressors (e.g., cumulative deployments). Outcomes included moderate or more severe depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Results The three-step method of latent class analysis identified three classes: low (58.86% of participants), moderate (21.62%), and high (19.52%) stress. Prevalence of mental health problems was significantly elevated in the high-stress class. In this group, 35.3%, 36.3%, and 39.5% of spouses' screenings indicated at least moderate depression, anxiety, and PTSD symptomatology, compared with 3.0%, 3.9%, and 2.7% in the low-stress group. Conclusions Results suggest many military spouses have low stress exposure across domains and low rates of mental health symptoms. However, a subset of spouses may experience both intrapersonal and family-level risk associated with elevated rates of mental health problems. Implications Findings highlight the critical role of nonmilitary stressors in the lives of military spouses and the importance of assessing for and providing support to spouses around these issues.

13 “We'll just draw the curtains!”: Military wives’ postures toward predeployment emotional preparation

“We'll just draw the curtains!”: Military wives’ postures toward predeployment emotional preparation

APA Citation:

Cafferky, B. M., Reyes, C. A. D., Beaver, S. L., & Shi, L. (2022). “We’ll just draw the curtains!”: Military wives’ postures toward predeployment emotional preparation. Family Relations, 71(1), 389-407. https://doi.org/10.1111/fare.12591

Focus:

Couples
Deployment
Mental health

Branch of Service:

Navy
Army
Marine Corps
Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Cafferky, Bryan M.; Reyes, Carmenoemi Angela D.; Beaver, Sarah L.; Shi, Lin

Year: 2022

Abstract

Objective This research explored how 13 military wives emotionally prepared for deployments, and how their preparation affected the degree of emotional difficulty experienced on deployment day. Background Previous research has identified that military wives emotionally detach or withdraw in order not to become emotionally overwhelmed leading up to deployment, but this may affect their deployment-day experience. Method A grounded theory approach to analyze semistructured interviews yielded emergent themes regarding how these military wives perceived the efficacy of emotionally preparing for deployment and their accompanying preparatory approaches. Results When preparing for deployment, these wives primarily adopted either a protective emotional preparation (PEP) approach (characterized by tactics of emotionally retreating, psyching yourself out, and/or circumventing emotional conversations) or a connective emotional preparation (CEP) approach (characterized by preemptive preparation, relying on husbands’ initiative, sharing quality time, or some sort of spiritual connection). Conclusion These PEP and CEP approaches seemed to influence the degree of emotional difficulty the wives reported experiencing on the day of deployment (traumatic vs. terribly difficult). Implications This PEP–CEP framework could help facilitate informed decisions about emotional preparation and Morse's emotional cycle of deployment. Implications and suggestions for policy and clinical considerations are discussed, including those pertaining to CFLEs, military organizations, and mental health professionals.

14 Exploring greater rates of breastfeeding among civilian military wives

Exploring greater rates of breastfeeding among civilian military wives

APA Citation:

Ringo, N., & Gephart, S. M. (2022). Exploring greater rates of breastfeeding among civilian military wives. Nursing for Women’s Health, 26(1), 10–20. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nwh.2021.11.003

Focus:

Parents
Children

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Ringo, Nicole; Gephart, Sheila M.

Year: 2022

Abstract

Objective To explore factors contributing to the greater rates of breastfeeding initiation and duration among civilian military wives (e.g., legally married to an active-duty spouse) and to determine what might be learned from these factors for intervention design for the broader population of women in the postpartum period. Design The study was conducted online using a concurrent mixed-methods design. Setting National and International U.S. military bases. Participants The sample consisted of 28 civilian military wives whose ages ranged from 18 to 45 years. Interventions/Measurements The Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale–Short Form and semistructured interviews. Results Breastfeeding self-efficacy was high among civilian military wives. Seven main themes with 16 subthemes emerged from the descriptions of the semistructured interviews. The results of the integrative analysis showed that factors within the military environment influence a sense of community and that there were supportive and pro-breastfeeding health care facilitators (especially lactation consultants). Conclusion Civilian military wives described breastfeeding facilitators who they believed promote their greater rates of breastfeeding initiation and continuation, quantified their high level of breastfeeding self-efficacy, and identified descriptive factors that contributed to both areas, topics that are lacking in the literature among this population.

15 The impact of military sexual trauma and warfare exposure on women veterans’ perinatal outcomes

The impact of military sexual trauma and warfare exposure on women veterans’ perinatal outcomes

APA Citation:

Nillni, Y. I., Fox, A. B., Cox, K., Paul, E., Vogt, D., & Galovski, T. E. (2022). The impact of military sexual trauma and warfare exposure on women veterans’ perinatal outcomes. Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy, 14(5), 730–737. https://doi.org/10.1037/tra0001095

Focus:

Children
Parents
Trauma
Physical health
Veterans

Branch of Service:

Army
Navy
Air Force
Coast Guard
Marine Corps
Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty
Veteran

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Nillni, Yael I.; Fox, Annie B.; Cox, Koriann; Paul, Emilie; Vogt, Dawne; Galovski, Tara E.

Year: 2022

Abstract

Objective: In the general population, history of trauma is associated with a range of adverse perinatal outcomes, which have long-term negative consequences for both mother and child. Research examining the impact of trauma, particularly trauma occurring during military service, on perinatal outcomes among women veterans is still in its nascence. The current study examined if warfare exposure and military sexual trauma (MST) contributed unique variance to the prediction of a broad range of adverse perinatal outcomes (i.e., preterm birth, full-term birth, infant birth weight, postpartum depression and/or anxiety). Method: Women veterans living across the U.S. (oversampled for veterans living in high crime communities) completed a mail-based survey, and reported information about all pregnancies that occurred since enlistment in the military. They also reported on warfare exposure and MST using the Deployment Risk and Resilience Inventory. Results: A total of 911 women reported on 1,752 unique pregnancies. Results revealed that MST, but not warfare exposure, was associated with having a lower infant birth weight (B = −17.30, SE = 5.41), a slight decrease in the likelihood of having a full-term birth (OR = .97, 95% CI [.93, 1.00]), and an increased likelihood of experiencing postpartum depression and/or anxiety (OR = 1.09, 95% CI [1.10, 1.14]) above and beyond age at pregnancy, racial/ethnic minority status, childhood violence exposure, and warfare exposure. Conclusions: Findings highlight the importance of screening for MST during pregnancy and trauma-informed obstetric care. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

16 Army home visitors’ implementation of military family violence prevention programming in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic

Army home visitors’ implementation of military family violence prevention programming in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic

APA Citation:

Ferrara, A. M., Kaye, M. P., Abram-Erby, G., Gernon, S., & Perkins, D. F. (2022). Army home visitors’ implementation of military family violence prevention programming in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. Couple and Family Psychology: Research and Practice. 11(1), 60-73. https://doi.org/10.1037/cfp0000193

Focus:

Child maltreatment
Parents
Programming

Branch of Service:

Army

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Ferrara, Amanda M.; Kaye, Miranda P.; Abram-Erby, Grejika; Gernon, Sean; Perkins, Daniel F.

Year: 2022

Abstract

The Army New Parent Support Program (Army NPSP) provides home visitation services that promote positive parenting strategies and aims to prevent family violence for expectant military parents and military families with children from birth to age 3. Since the onset of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19), Army NPSP services have rapidly adapted to a telehealth model to fit with the suggested practices of physical distancing. Employing a grounded theory approach, nine virtual focus groups with 30 Army NPSP home visitors across eight installations were conducted to examine how this rapid shift has impacted their services, practice, and professional role. The present study identified two overarching themes: (1) working with families (e.g., continued engagement with families, increased communication, shifting family needs) and (2) adjusting to telework (e.g., technology, professional collaboration and communication, professional growth). Findings from these focus groups indicated that home visitors were actively engaged with their clients and experienced both challenges and benefits of telehealth. While the rapid transition was a big change, and home visitors missed the face-to-face interactions, they expressed that they were adapting and improving their virtual service delivery with time. Increased concerns regarding families’ well-being due to social and physical isolation, increased symptoms of anxiety and depression, and grief for losses due to COVID-19, along with the ability to continue connections with these highly mobile families, points to the importance of telehealth as a means to implement parenting programs vital to military family well-being. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)

17 Trajectories of relational turbulence and affectionate communication across the post-deployment transition

Trajectories of relational turbulence and affectionate communication across the post-deployment transition

APA Citation:

Knobloch, L. K., Knobloch-Fedders, L. M., Yorgason, J. B., Wehrman, E. C., & Monk, J. K. (2022). Trajectories of relational turbulence and affectionate communication across the post-deployment transition. Communication Monographs, 89(2), 189-210. https://doi.org/10.1080/03637751.2021.1963792

Focus:

Couples

Branch of Service:

Army
Navy
Marine Corps
Air Force
Coast Guard
Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty
Guard

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Knobloch, Leanne K.; Knobloch-Fedders, Lynne M.; Yorgason, Jeremy B.; Wehrman, Erin C.; Kale Monk, J.

Year: 2022

Abstract

Affectionate communication may play a key role in how military couples navigate the transition from deployment to reintegration. Informed by relational turbulence theory, this study considered how the trajectory of relational turbulence experienced by military couples over time predicted their verbal and nonverbal expressions of affection. Online self-report data were gathered from 268 U.S. military couples across eight months beginning at homecoming. Relational turbulence increased over time and affectionate communication decreased over time. Also as predicted, the trajectory of increasing relational turbulence corresponded with greater declines in verbal and nonverbal expressions of affection. These results advance relational turbulence theory, illuminate the trajectory of affectionate communication over time, and inform ways to assist military couples upon reunion after deployment.

18 Brief report: Identifying concerns of military caregivers with children diagnosed with asd following a military directed relocation

Brief report: Identifying concerns of military caregivers with children diagnosed with asd following a military directed relocation

APA Citation:

Farley, B. E., Griffith, A., Mahoney, A., Zhang, D., & Kruse, L. (2022). Brief report: Identifying concerns of military caregivers with children diagnosed with ASD following a military directed relocation. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 52(1), 447-453. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10803-021-04936-7

Focus:

Children
Other
Parents

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches
Air Force
Army
Coast Guard
Navy

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Farley, Britt E.; Griffith, Annette; Mahoney, Amanda; Zhang, Dorthy; Kruse, Laura

Year: 2022

Abstract

Military families relocate three times more often than non-military families. Those whom have children diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder face challenges related to inconsistencies in services, delay of services, and lack of continuity of care. The current study expands the limited research examining the experiences of military families with children with Autism by focusing on impact of relocation, specifically identifying potential causes of delays in services. An online survey of 25 military caregivers of children with autism suggests potential delays in service related to provider waitlists, obtaining new referrals, and lengthy intake processes. The impact of these inconsistencies is discussed in relation to child progress and the need for future research in this area. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)

19 Getting food to the table: Challenges, strategies, and compromises experienced by low-income veterans raising children

Getting food to the table: Challenges, strategies, and compromises experienced by low-income veterans raising children

APA Citation:

Kamdar, N., True, G., Lorenz, L., Loeb, A., & Hernandez, D. C. (2022). Getting food to the table: Challenges, strategies, and compromises experienced by low-income veterans raising children. Journal of Hunger & Environmental Nutrition. 17(1), 32-52. https://doi.org/10.1080/19320248.2020.1855284

Focus:

Programming
Veterans
Other

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Veteran

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Kamdar, Nipa; True, Gala; Lorenz, Laura; Loeb, Aaron; Hernandez, Daphne C.

Year: 2022

Abstract

Using photo-elicitation, 17 low-income, post-9/11 Veterans with children residing in/near Houston, TX shared experiences getting food to their table. Limited money, time, and disabilities challenged access to healthy meals. Limited resources decreased choice and control over what Veterans fed their children. Affordable, accessible food fell below nutritional standards. Veterans rationed their own intake to preserve food for their children. Informed by Veterans’ experiences, we developed a model of three factors – resources, personal capacity, and culture – that influence quality, quantity, and type of food low-income Veterans access. Policies to help Veterans increase access to nutritious food need to consider these factors.

20 Latent profiles of postdeployment reintegration among service members and their partners

Latent profiles of postdeployment reintegration among service members and their partners

APA Citation:

O’Neal, C. W., & Lavner, J. A. (2022). Latent profiles of postdeployment reintegration among service members and their partners. Journal of Family Psychology. 36(1), 35–45. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/fam0000894

Focus:

Couples
Deployment
Mental health
Physical health

Branch of Service:

Army

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: O'Neal, Catherine Walker; Lavner, Justin A.

Year: 2022

Abstract

Consistent with the emotional cycle of deployment, postdeployment reintegration is often a time of highs and lows as service members (SMs) and their families adjust to their new normal. However, few studies have considered the nuances of reintegration, specifically the various patterns of personal and family reintegration experiences that may exist. The present study uses latent profile analysis to identify unique reintegration patterns along four dimensions (i.e., positive personal, negative personal, positive family, and negative family reintegration) for SMs (N = 236) and a subsample of their civilian partners (N = 141). Differences among the resulting reintegration profiles were also examined for demographics, military-related characteristics, psychosocial characteristics, and individual and family functioning. Three profile groups with varying reintegration experiences emerged for SMs, and two groups emerged for civilian partners. For both SMs and their civilian partners, one profile (39.0% of SMs and 63.8% of civilian partners) was characterized by high positive family and personal reintegration and low negative family and personal reintegration. Other groups reported moderate to high positive and negative family and personal reintegration. SMs and civilian partners with the most favorable reintegration profile reported greater family cohesion. For SMs, differences in sleep were also reported across the reintegration profiles, whereas, for civilian partners, differences in depressive symptoms emerged across the reintegration profiles. Few group differences emerged for demographics, military-related characteristics, and psychosocial characteristics. Findings highlight important variability in military families' experiences within the reintegration stage of the deployment cycle. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Last

Showing dictionary results for:

An interaction occurs when an independent variable has a different effect on the outcome depending on the values of another independent variable

Category: Methodology

"An umbrella term for people whose gender identity and/or gender expression differs from what is typically associated with the sex they were assigned at birth. People under the transgender umbrella may describe their gender identity using one or more of a wide variety of terms – including but not limited to transgender. The term “trans” is often used as shorthand. "

"A pattern of alcohol consumption that increases someone's risk of harm. Some would limit this definition to the physical or mental health consequences (as in harmful use). Others would include the social consequences. The term is currently used by the World Health Organization to describe this pattern of alcohol consumption. It is not a diagnostic term."

4 Gay

"A term used to describe a man who is attracted to another man; this term may also be used by women attracted to another woman. "

5 Purple

“A term indicating that an activity or a program includes all branches of the U.S. Armed Forces.”

Category: Military

6 Post

“The Army term for a military installation.”

Category: Military

Related Terms:

“A short-term stressful event or situation (e.g., a child having difficulties with a friend).”

Showing monthly topics for:

This website uses cookies to improve the browsing experience of our users. Please review Auburn University’s Privacy Statement for more information. Accept & Close