(334) 844-3299
MilitaryREACH@auburn.edu
Search Results
Make a new Search
Search in Library (1565) Results

Library (1565)

Dictionary (714)

Research in Action (85)

News (55)

Showing library results for: ALL

Filters: Research Summary

1 - 20 of 1565

1 Emerging adult military-connected students express challenges transitioning into higher education: Implications for helping professionals

Emerging adult military-connected students express challenges transitioning into higher education: Implications for helping professionals

APA Citation:

Clary, K. L., & Byrne, L. (2023). Emerging adult military-connected students express challenges transitioning into higher education: Implications for helping professionals. Community College Journal of Research and Practice, 47(1), 22-37. https://doi.org/10.1080/10668926.2021.1925176

Focus:

Substance use
Other

Branch of Service:

Marine Corps
Navy
Air Force
Army

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty
Veteran
Guard

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Clary, Kelly Lynn; Byrne, Lucy

Year: 2023

Abstract

Emerging adult (EA; aged 18–29) military-connected students experience major developmental changes, often coupled with the transition into the civilian sector and higher education. This conglomeration may exacerbate anxiety, stress, and negative coping mechanisms, including substance use. Substance use rates are highest among EAs, across the lifespan. To our knowledge, limited research has looked at EA military-connected students’ transition into higher education during this developmental stage. We qualitatively interviewed 16 EA military-connected students who reported high-risk substance use behaviors. To our knowledge, no student veteran research study has considered this characteristic. This is important since military members are more likely to misuse substances and encounter related consequences than their civilian counterparts, and these developmental and transitional stressors put them at higher risk for misusing substances. In 74-minute interviews, we asked participants about (1) challenges transitioning into higher education and (2) techniques helping professionals should use to support EA military-connected students. Two coders employed Thematic Analysis to identify themes using NVivo. We found challenges include: (1) starting over, (2) unable to relate to others, (3) lacking a purpose or plan, (4) support system changes, and (5) people view you as only a veteran. EA military-connected students’ suggestions for helping professionals include: (1) use straightforward communication, (2) show a genuine interest, (3) offer guidance on creating a support system, and (4) treat me as a human, not only a veteran. This study provides translational examples for helping professionals such as encouraging involvement in military and veteran community organizations to promote a sense of belonging.

2 Psychologist veteran status as a predictor of veterans’ willingness to engage in psychotherapy

Psychologist veteran status as a predictor of veterans’ willingness to engage in psychotherapy

APA Citation:

Yeterian, J. D., & Dutra, S. J. (2023). Psychologist veteran status as a predictor of veterans' willingness to engage in psychotherapy. Military Psychology, 35(1), 50-57. https://doi.org/10.1080/08995605.2022.2066937

Focus:

Veterans
Mental health

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Veteran

Population:

Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Yeterian, Julie D.; Dutra, Sunny J.

Year: 2023

Abstract

Many veterans experience difficulties with mental health and functioning, yet many do not seek treatment and dropout rates are high. A small body of literature suggests that veterans prefer to work with providers or peer support specialists who are also veterans. Research with trauma-exposed veterans suggests that some veterans prefer to work with female providers. In an experimental study with 414 veterans, we examined whether veterans’ ratings of a psychologist (e.g., helpfulness, ability to understand the participant, likelihood of making an appointment) described in a vignette were impacted by the psychologist’s veteran status and gender. Results indicated that veterans who read about a veteran psychologist rated the psychologist as more able to help and understand them, reported being more willing to see and more comfortable seeing the psychologist, and reported greater belief that they should see the psychologist, relative to those who read about a non-veteran psychologist. Contrary to hypotheses, there was no main effect of psychologist gender nor any interaction between psychologist gender and psychologist veteran status on ratings. Findings suggest that having access to mental health providers who are also veterans may reduce barriers to treatment-seeking among veteran patients.

3 Body image and psychosocial well-being among UK military personnel and veterans who sustained appearance-altering conflict injuries

Body image and psychosocial well-being among UK military personnel and veterans who sustained appearance-altering conflict injuries

APA Citation:

Keeling, M., Williamson, H., Williams, V. S., Kiff, J., Evans, S., Murphy, D., & Harcourt, D. (2023). Body image and psychosocial well-being among UK military personnel and veterans who sustained appearance-altering conflict injuries. Military Psychology, 35(1), 12-26. https://doi.org/10.1080/08995605.2022.2058302

Focus:

Mental health
Trauma
Veterans

Branch of Service:

International Military

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty
Veteran

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Keeling, Mary; Williamson, Heidi; Williams, Victoria S.; Kiff, James; Evans, Sarah; Murphy, Dominic; Harcourt, Diana

Year: 2023

Abstract

A modest but significant number of military personnel sustained injuries during deployments resulting in an altered-appearance (e.g., limb loss and/or scarring). Civilian research indicates that appearance-altering injuries can affect psychosocial wellbeing, yet little is known about the impact of such injuries among injured personnel. This study aimed to understand the psychosocial impact of appearance-altering injuries and possible support needs among UK military personnel and veterans. Semi-structured interviews with 23 military participants who sustained appearance-altering injuries during deployments or training since 1969 were conducted. The interviews were analyzed using reflexive thematic analysis, identifying six master themes. These themes indicate that in the context of broader recovery experiences, military personnel and veterans experience a variety of psychosocial difficulties related to their changed appearance. While some of these are consistent with evidence from civilians, military-related nuances in the challenges, protective experiences, coping approaches, and preferences for support are evident. Personnel and veterans with appearance-altering injuries may require specific support for adjusting to their changed appearance and related difficulties. However, barriers to acknowledging appearance concerns were identified. Implications for support provision and future research are discussed.

4 The impact of military sexual trauma and warfare exposure on women veterans’ perinatal outcomes

The impact of military sexual trauma and warfare exposure on women veterans’ perinatal outcomes

APA Citation:

Nillni, Y. I., Fox, A. B., Cox, K., Paul, E., Vogt, D., & Galovski, T. E. (2022). The impact of military sexual trauma and warfare exposure on women veterans’ perinatal outcomes. Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy, 14(5), 730–737. https://doi.org/10.1037/tra0001095

Focus:

Children
Parents
Trauma
Physical health
Veterans

Branch of Service:

Army
Navy
Air Force
Coast Guard
Marine Corps
Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty
Veteran

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Nillni, Yael I.; Fox, Annie B.; Cox, Koriann; Paul, Emilie; Vogt, Dawne; Galovski, Tara E.

Year: 2022

Abstract

Objective: In the general population, history of trauma is associated with a range of adverse perinatal outcomes, which have long-term negative consequences for both mother and child. Research examining the impact of trauma, particularly trauma occurring during military service, on perinatal outcomes among women veterans is still in its nascence. The current study examined if warfare exposure and military sexual trauma (MST) contributed unique variance to the prediction of a broad range of adverse perinatal outcomes (i.e., preterm birth, full-term birth, infant birth weight, postpartum depression and/or anxiety). Method: Women veterans living across the U.S. (oversampled for veterans living in high crime communities) completed a mail-based survey, and reported information about all pregnancies that occurred since enlistment in the military. They also reported on warfare exposure and MST using the Deployment Risk and Resilience Inventory. Results: A total of 911 women reported on 1,752 unique pregnancies. Results revealed that MST, but not warfare exposure, was associated with having a lower infant birth weight (B = −17.30, SE = 5.41), a slight decrease in the likelihood of having a full-term birth (OR = .97, 95% CI [.93, 1.00]), and an increased likelihood of experiencing postpartum depression and/or anxiety (OR = 1.09, 95% CI [1.10, 1.14]) above and beyond age at pregnancy, racial/ethnic minority status, childhood violence exposure, and warfare exposure. Conclusions: Findings highlight the importance of screening for MST during pregnancy and trauma-informed obstetric care. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

5 Trajectories of relational turbulence and affectionate communication across the post-deployment transition

Trajectories of relational turbulence and affectionate communication across the post-deployment transition

APA Citation:

Knobloch, L. K., Knobloch-Fedders, L. M., Yorgason, J. B., Wehrman, E. C., & Monk, J. K. (2022). Trajectories of relational turbulence and affectionate communication across the post-deployment transition. Communication Monographs, 89(2), 189-210. https://doi.org/10.1080/03637751.2021.1963792

Focus:

Couples

Branch of Service:

Army
Navy
Marine Corps
Air Force
Coast Guard
Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty
Guard

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Knobloch, Leanne K.; Knobloch-Fedders, Lynne M.; Yorgason, Jeremy B.; Wehrman, Erin C.; Kale Monk, J.

Year: 2022

Abstract

Affectionate communication may play a key role in how military couples navigate the transition from deployment to reintegration. Informed by relational turbulence theory, this study considered how the trajectory of relational turbulence experienced by military couples over time predicted their verbal and nonverbal expressions of affection. Online self-report data were gathered from 268 U.S. military couples across eight months beginning at homecoming. Relational turbulence increased over time and affectionate communication decreased over time. Also as predicted, the trajectory of increasing relational turbulence corresponded with greater declines in verbal and nonverbal expressions of affection. These results advance relational turbulence theory, illuminate the trajectory of affectionate communication over time, and inform ways to assist military couples upon reunion after deployment.

6 Brief report: Identifying concerns of military caregivers with children diagnosed with asd following a military directed relocation

Brief report: Identifying concerns of military caregivers with children diagnosed with asd following a military directed relocation

APA Citation:

Farley, B. E., Griffith, A., Mahoney, A., Zhang, D., & Kruse, L. (2022). Brief report: Identifying concerns of military caregivers with children diagnosed with ASD following a military directed relocation. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 52(1), 447-453. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10803-021-04936-7

Focus:

Children
Other
Parents

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches
Air Force
Army
Coast Guard
Navy

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Farley, Britt E.; Griffith, Annette; Mahoney, Amanda; Zhang, Dorthy; Kruse, Laura

Year: 2022

Abstract

Military families relocate three times more often than non-military families. Those whom have children diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder face challenges related to inconsistencies in services, delay of services, and lack of continuity of care. The current study expands the limited research examining the experiences of military families with children with Autism by focusing on impact of relocation, specifically identifying potential causes of delays in services. An online survey of 25 military caregivers of children with autism suggests potential delays in service related to provider waitlists, obtaining new referrals, and lengthy intake processes. The impact of these inconsistencies is discussed in relation to child progress and the need for future research in this area. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)

7 Getting food to the table: Challenges, strategies, and compromises experienced by low-income veterans raising children

Getting food to the table: Challenges, strategies, and compromises experienced by low-income veterans raising children

APA Citation:

Kamdar, N., True, G., Lorenz, L., Loeb, A., & Hernandez, D. C. (2022). Getting food to the table: Challenges, strategies, and compromises experienced by low-income veterans raising children. Journal of Hunger & Environmental Nutrition. 17(1), 32-52. https://doi.org/10.1080/19320248.2020.1855284

Focus:

Programming
Veterans
Other

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Veteran

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Kamdar, Nipa; True, Gala; Lorenz, Laura; Loeb, Aaron; Hernandez, Daphne C.

Year: 2022

Abstract

Using photo-elicitation, 17 low-income, post-9/11 Veterans with children residing in/near Houston, TX shared experiences getting food to their table. Limited money, time, and disabilities challenged access to healthy meals. Limited resources decreased choice and control over what Veterans fed their children. Affordable, accessible food fell below nutritional standards. Veterans rationed their own intake to preserve food for their children. Informed by Veterans’ experiences, we developed a model of three factors – resources, personal capacity, and culture – that influence quality, quantity, and type of food low-income Veterans access. Policies to help Veterans increase access to nutritious food need to consider these factors.

8 Latent profiles of postdeployment reintegration among service members and their partners

Latent profiles of postdeployment reintegration among service members and their partners

APA Citation:

O’Neal, C. W., & Lavner, J. A. (2022). Latent profiles of postdeployment reintegration among service members and their partners. Journal of Family Psychology. 36(1), 35–45. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/fam0000894

Focus:

Couples
Deployment
Mental health
Physical health

Branch of Service:

Army

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: O'Neal, Catherine Walker; Lavner, Justin A.

Year: 2022

Abstract

Consistent with the emotional cycle of deployment, postdeployment reintegration is often a time of highs and lows as service members (SMs) and their families adjust to their new normal. However, few studies have considered the nuances of reintegration, specifically the various patterns of personal and family reintegration experiences that may exist. The present study uses latent profile analysis to identify unique reintegration patterns along four dimensions (i.e., positive personal, negative personal, positive family, and negative family reintegration) for SMs (N = 236) and a subsample of their civilian partners (N = 141). Differences among the resulting reintegration profiles were also examined for demographics, military-related characteristics, psychosocial characteristics, and individual and family functioning. Three profile groups with varying reintegration experiences emerged for SMs, and two groups emerged for civilian partners. For both SMs and their civilian partners, one profile (39.0% of SMs and 63.8% of civilian partners) was characterized by high positive family and personal reintegration and low negative family and personal reintegration. Other groups reported moderate to high positive and negative family and personal reintegration. SMs and civilian partners with the most favorable reintegration profile reported greater family cohesion. For SMs, differences in sleep were also reported across the reintegration profiles, whereas, for civilian partners, differences in depressive symptoms emerged across the reintegration profiles. Few group differences emerged for demographics, military-related characteristics, and psychosocial characteristics. Findings highlight important variability in military families' experiences within the reintegration stage of the deployment cycle. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).

9 Peer experiences of military spouses with children with Autism in a distance peer mentoring program: A pilot study

Peer experiences of military spouses with children with Autism in a distance peer mentoring program: A pilot study

APA Citation:

Kremkow, J. M. D., & Finke, E. H. (2022). Peer experiences of military spouses with children with autism in a distance peer mentoring program: A pilot study. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders. 52(1), 189-202. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10803-021-04937-6

Focus:

Children
Other
Parents
Programming

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty
Guard
Reserve

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Kremkow, Jennifer M. D.; Finke, Erinn H.

Year: 2022

Abstract

Previous research has indicated military families with children with autism reported significant difficulties when relocating with their child with autism. One possible relocation support for these families is an online peer mentorship program with another military spouse with a child with autism who has more relocation experience. The purpose of this pilot investigation was to determine the feasibility, acceptability, and collect initial outcome data for an online peer mentorship program for military spouses with children with autism. Results from this study indicated an online peer mentorship program is feasible, and may be a helpful program to support military spouses with children with autism before relocations.

10 Protective factors for military veteran fathers’ parenting functioning and satisfaction

Protective factors for military veteran fathers’ parenting functioning and satisfaction

APA Citation:

Karre, J. K., Morgan, N. R., Bleser, J. A., & Perkins, D. F. (2022). Protective factors for military veteran fathers’ parenting functioning and satisfaction. Journal of Family Issues. 43(1), 215-236. https://doi.org/10.1177/0192513X21993852

Focus:

Children
Couples
Parents
Veterans

Branch of Service:

Air Force
Army
Marine Corps
Multiple branches
Navy

Military Affiliation:

Veteran

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)
Adolescence (13 - 17 yrs)
Very old (85 yrs & older)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Karre, Jennifer K.; Morgan, Nicole R.; Bleser, Julia A.; Perkins, Daniel F.

Year: 2022

Abstract

Employing a strengths-based perspective, this study examined protective factors related to fathers’ positive parenting behaviors and parenting satisfaction. The sample included 3,810 active duty veteran fathers who separated from the active component and had at least one child 18 years and younger. Logistic regression analyses indicated that financial status, health functioning, resilience, social support, positive social functioning with community and friends, and positive social functioning with relatives were all associated with parenting functioning. The interaction of the number of deployments and resilience was related to parenting functioning. Furthermore, health functioning, resilience, social support, positive social functioning with community and friends, and positive social functioning with relatives were associated with parenting satisfaction. Among fathers in a romantic relationship, the interaction of the number of deployments and romantic relationship functioning and the interaction of the number of deployments and romantic relationship satisfaction were both related to parenting functioning and parenting satisfaction.

11 Interpersonal trauma histories and relationship functioning among LGB veteran couples seeking PTSD treatment

Interpersonal trauma histories and relationship functioning among LGB veteran couples seeking PTSD treatment

APA Citation:

Rashkovsky, K., Solano, I., Khalifian, C., Morland, L. A., & Knopp, K. (2022). Interpersonal trauma histories and relationship functioning among LGB veteran couples seeking PTSD treatment. Military Psychology, 34(4), 494-501. https://doi.org/10.1080/08 995605.2021.2016308

Focus:

Veterans
Couples
Trauma

Branch of Service:

Navy
Army
Marine Corps
Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Veteran

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Rashkovsky, Katerine; Solano, Ingrid; Khalifian, Chandra; Morland, Leslie A.; Knopp, Kayla

Year: 2022

Abstract

Lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) Veterans report greater emotional distress, trauma exposure, and PTSD rates than both LGB civilians and non-LGB Veterans. Traumatic experiences impact intimate relationships, potentially placing LGB Veterans at higher risk of relationship dysfunction secondary to trauma and PTSD. However, limited research has examined links between relationship functioning and trauma histories among couples with one or more LGB-identifying partners. In this exploratory study, participants include 21 couples from a larger treatment study comprising a PTSD-diagnosed Veteran and their significant other in which at least one partner identified as LGB. Variables included trauma experiences, PTSD symptom severity, and relationship satisfaction. A descriptive analysis revealed high relationship satisfaction despite high interpersonal trauma rates among both PTSD-diagnosed Veterans and their partners. Further, we found different patterns of relationship functioning depending on whether a participant had experienced sexual assault. These initial analyses present novel data on trauma in treatment-seeking LGB veteran couples and provide an important basis for future research on couple-based mental health treatments for this population.

12 Families serve too: Military spouse well-being after separation from active-duty service

Families serve too: Military spouse well-being after separation from active-duty service

APA Citation:

Corry, N. H., Joneydi, R., McMaster, H. S., Williams, C. S., Glynn, S., Spera, C., & Stander, V. A. (2022). Families serve too: Military spouse well-being after separation from active-duty service. Anxiety, Stress, & Coping, 35(5), 501-517. https://doi.org/10.1080/10615806.2022.2038788

Focus:

Couples
Deployment
Mental health
Physical health

Branch of Service:

Army
Navy
Marine Corps
Air Force
Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty
Veteran
Guard
Reserve

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Corry, Nida H.; Joneydi, Rayan; McMaster, Hope S.; Williams, Christianna S.; Glynn, Shirley; Spera, Christopher; Stander, Valerie A.

Year: 2022

Abstract

Background and Objectives Transitioning from military to civilian life can be challenging for families, but most research focuses only on the service member. We applied a life course model to assess spouse well-being following this important transition.Design Prospective, longitudinal survey of service members and their spousesMethods We captured three spouse well-being domains: psychological health, physical health, and family relationships. We identified differences between families who separated from service and those still affiliated (N = 4,087) and assessed baseline factors associated with spouse well-being after the family separated from service (N = 1,199).Results Spouses of service members who had separated from the military (versus those who had not) reported poorer mental health and family relationship quality at baseline and follow-up. After controlling for baseline differences, spouses whose families transitioned experienced a greater increase in PTSD symptoms and a steeper decline in quality of marriage. Spouses of active-duty service members reported greater increases in work–family conflict. Among families who had transitioned, the most consistent predictor of positive outcomes was baseline well-being. Protective factors included having more psychological and social resources and less financial stress.Conclusions Several protective and risk factors identified in the study may inform programming for families transitioning from active duty.

13 Prospective mental health effects of intimate partner stalking among women veterans

Prospective mental health effects of intimate partner stalking among women veterans

APA Citation:

Davin, K. R., Dardis, C. M., Barth, M. R., & Iverson, K. M. (2022). Prospective mental health effects of intimate partner stalking among women veterans. Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy, 14(5), 751–758. https://doi.org/10.1037/tra0001144

Focus:

Veterans
Mental health
Trauma

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Veteran

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Davin, Katie R.; Dardis, Christina M.; Barth, Michelle R.; Iverson, Katherine M.

Year: 2022

Abstract

Objective: Women veterans are disproportionately affected by intimate partner violence (IPV). Within the civilian literature, intimate partner stalking (IPS) is a common, uniquely deleterious form of IPV; the present study seeks to prospectively examine the psychological effects of IPS among women veterans. Method: Women veterans (n = 266) were recruited using the KnowledgePanel, a probability-based survey panel; participants completed surveys at time 1 (T1) and at time 2 (T2) follow-up 18 months later. Women responded to questionnaires assessing IPV and IPS experiences, and symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and anxiety. Results: At T1, 54.5% of women reported lifetime IPV, of whom 64.1% reported IPS; at T2, 49.2% reported past-year IPV, of whom 7.6% experienced past-year IPS. Bivariately, women in the T1 IPS group reported higher T2 PTSD, depression, and anxiety symptoms than the T1 IPV only and no IPV groups. In a multivariate model, there remained indirect effects of T1 IPS on T2 PTSD symptoms, when other forms of violence (i.e., T1 and T2 IPV, MST, IPS) were controlled. Conclusions: When added to models including other forms of IPV, women who experienced IPS reported increased risk for PTSD symptoms, which predicted heightened PTSD symptoms over time. Providers treating women veterans should assess for experiences of IPS as an additional form of IPV and address PTSD to prevent the development of subsequent comorbid psychopathology. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)

14 Does Strength at Home for Couples prevent sexual aggression in returning veterans? Examining randomized controlled trial findings

Does Strength at Home for Couples prevent sexual aggression in returning veterans? Examining randomized controlled trial findings

APA Citation:

Taft, C. T., Gallagher, M. W., Hoffmann, A., Cole, H. E., & Creech, S. K. (2022). Does Strength at Home for Couples prevent sexual aggression in returning veterans? Examining randomized controlled trial findings. Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy. 14(3), 431–436. https://doi.org/10.1037/tra0001034

Focus:

Couples

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Guard
Reserve
Active Duty

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Taft, Casey T.; Gallagher, Matthew W.; Hoffmann, Amy; Cole, Hannah E.; Creech, Suzannah K.

Year: 2022

Abstract

Objective: Sexual aggression between intimate partners is a serious problem. This study examined this problem in returning male veterans and their female partners, and the effectiveness of an intervention for intimate partner violence (IPV) in preventing sexual aggression using data gathered during a randomized controlled trial. Method: Rates of sexual aggression and the effectiveness of the Strength at Home Couples (SAH-C) intervention were examined in a sample of 69 couples with a returning male veteran from Iraq/Afghanistan who participated in a randomized controlled trial for intimate partner violence (IPV) prevention. Couples were assessed at 4 timepoints: immediately prior to the intervention, immediately following the intervention, 6 months postintervention, and 12 months postintervention. Results: It was found that 57% of couples reported the presence of intimate partner sexual aggression in their relationship across the assessment points, with higher rates reported at baseline than other time points and for veterans relative to their partners. The most commonly endorsed items were 'I insisted on sex when my partner didn’t want to' and 'I made my partner have sex without a condom.' Overall, couples randomized to SAH-C showed greater declines in sexual aggression than couples who were randomized to Supportive Prevention, with particularly strong differences across conditions from baseline to posttreatment. Conclusions: These data suggest that this trauma-informed couples-based intervention based on a social information processing model may assist in reducing intimate partner sexual aggression and builds on prior findings demonstrating the program be associated with the prevention of physical and psychological IPV. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)

15 Transgenerational exposure to combat: Military family, moral dilemmas, reclaiming self

Transgenerational exposure to combat: Military family, moral dilemmas, reclaiming self

APA Citation:

McCormack, L., Hogan, M., & Devine, W. (2022). Transgenerational exposure to combat: Military family, moral dilemmas, reclaiming self. Traumatology, 28(1), 1-10. https://doi.org/10.1037/trm0000298

Focus:

Parents
Trauma

Branch of Service:

International Military

Military Affiliation:

Veteran

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: McCormack, Lynne; Hogan, Matthew; Devine, Wendy

Year: 2022

Abstract

Children of veterans commonly join the armed forces, yet little research explores transgenerational exposure to combat trauma. This ideographic study sought positive and negative interpretations from veterans exposed vicariously as children to combat related trauma and primarily as personnel deployed to combat. Semistructured interviews provided the data for transcription and analysis using interpretative phenomenological analysis. One overarching superordinate theme, military family, moral dilemmas, reclaiming self, highlights a layered struggle for autonomy from a fractured relationship with a veteran father, the lack of preparedness for moral confrontation in combat from the larger military family, and a sense of betrayal from both father and organization in reconnecting with civilian life. Despite intermittent opportunities for shared connections between father and son, their fathers’ resistance to sharing personal combat narratives brought distance and resentment. This was compounded by perceived organizational betrayal, where participants felt morally unprepared for the 'cultural' threats of war. Feelings of shame and moral injury plagued 'self' post service; however, purpose and meaning were expressed as a desire to parent differently from their own fathers. Importantly, though results are not generalizable, this study highlights the importance of postdeployment family education to reduce potential self-blame and self-doubt in male children of veterans exposed vicariously to the toxic masculinity of disengaged and brutal parenting styles following combat trauma. Second, this study reveals the importance of postdeployment reintegration training for restoration of moral integrity in life after the military. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)

16 Factors predicting family violence revictimization among Army families with child maltreatment

Factors predicting family violence revictimization among Army families with child maltreatment

APA Citation:

Kaye, M. P., Aronson, K. R., & Perkins, D. F. (2022). Factors predicting family violence revictimization among Army families with child maltreatment. Child Maltreatment, 27(3), 423-433. https://doi.org/10.1177/10775595211008997

Focus:

Child maltreatment
Children
Parents
Programming

Branch of Service:

Army

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty

Population:

Childhood (birth - 12 yrs)
Adolescence (13 - 17 yrs)
Adulthood (18 yrs & older)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Kaye, Miranda P.; Aronson, Keith R.; Perkins, Daniel F.

Year: 2022

Abstract

The Army Family Advocacy Program (Army FAP) strives to prevent family violence and intervene to reduce the deleterious effects of exposure to family violence. This paper examines the individual, family, community, and treatment factors associated with family violence revictimization. Case files of 134 families with substantiated child maltreatment and associated Army FAP interventions that closed in 2013 were coded across risk and protective factors and intervention characteristics and were matched to Army Central Registry files to identify revictimization rates through 2017. Revictimization, experienced by 23% of families, was predicted by community risk and reduced by intervention dose. With the high rates of relocations, housing or neighborhood issues, and the isolation military families experience and the relationship of these concerns to repeated family violence, identifying the impact of community risk is particularly important. Similarly, research that elucidates the effective treatment components is needed.

17 Perceived barriers to mental healthcare among spouses of military service members

Perceived barriers to mental healthcare among spouses of military service members

APA Citation:

Schvey, N. A., Burke, D., Pearlman, A. T., Britt, T. W., Riggs, D. S., Carballo, C., & Stander, V. (2022). Perceived barriers to mental healthcare among spouses of military service members. Psychological Services, 19(2), 396–405. https://doi.org/10.1037/ser0000523

Focus:

Couples
Mental health
Programming

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty

Population:

Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Schvey, Natasha A.; Burke, Daniel; Pearlman, Arielle T.; Britt, Thomas W.; Riggs, David S.; Carballo, Carlos; Stander, Valerie

Year: 2022

Abstract

Barriers to mental healthcare services are reported among military service members. However, little is known about these barriers among the spouses of military personnel, who face unique stressors and may subsequently be at high-need for mental health services. Understanding barriers to care among this vulnerable population may help improve access to psychological services. The current study utilized data from the Millennium Cohort Family Study. Participants were referred by their military spouses or through targeted mailers. Participants completed self-report measures of mood, psychosocial functioning, and perceived barriers to mental healthcare via web- or paper-based surveys. A factor analysis was conducted to identify subscales of the barriers to mental healthcare measure, and logistic regressions were conducted adjusting for relevant sociodemographic variables, to determine psychosocial factors associated with likelihood of reporting barriers to mental healthcare. The sample comprised 9,666 military spouses (86% female; Mage: 27.73 ± 5.09; 29.2% racial/ethnic minority; 19.5% with prior/current military service). Logistic factors were the most frequently reported barrier to care (63%), followed by negative beliefs about mental healthcare (52%), fear of social/occupational consequences (35%), and internalized stigma (32%). Spouses with prior or current military service themselves and individuals with a psychiatric condition were most likely to report barriers to mental healthcare. A preponderance of military spouses reported barriers to mental healthcare services. Prospective data are needed to elucidate the associations between barriers to care and mental healthcare utilization. Efforts may be warranted to improve access to mental healthcare among the spouses of military personnel. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)

18 Coming home: A feasibility study of self-guided dialogues to facilitate soldiers’ social interactions and integration

Coming home: A feasibility study of self-guided dialogues to facilitate soldiers’ social interactions and integration

APA Citation:

Milstein, G., Guerrero, M., Palitsky, R., Robinson, L., & Espinosa, A. (2022). Coming home: A feasibility study of self-guided dialogues to facilitate soldiers’ social interactions and integration. Military Psychology, 34(2), 252–259. https://doi.org/10.1080/08995605.2021.1986344

Focus:

Programming
Veterans

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Guard

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Milstein, Glen; Guerrero, Mayra; Palitsky, Roman; Robinson, Leslie; Espinosa, Adriana

Year: 2022

Abstract

The success of service members’ transition from military to civilian life is an ongoing concern for their personal well-being, for their families, and for our communities. There is a need for interventions to promote improved social integration. This one-arm feasibility study examined the ease of use, satisfaction, and desire for social interaction in response to the Warrior Spirit/Mission Homefront (WS/MH) self-guided dialogue program, which facilitates conversations among small groups of fellow service members through gamified activities (N = 299 service members). Through the use of a specially designed card deck and game, service members answer questions written to elicit responses about themselves and their military service. WS/MH dialogs and discussions model how persons can speak about deployment and military service with others. These discussions facilitate the articulation of experiences across a range of difficulties – according to persons’ own comfort threshold – in order to cultivate language that can translate to conversations with which to reconnect with family and community. The activity demonstrated high satisfaction, and yielded the anticipated increases in positive emotion (p = .013) and desire for social interaction (p = .001) in pre-post comparisons. Satisfaction was associated with change in positive emotions and change in willingness to talk with others. This provides initial evidence of good feasibility and satisfaction with WS/MH, as a promising and readily scalable tool in the ongoing efforts to improve service members’ and Veterans’ social interactions, belongingness and emotional well-being as they come home.

19 Associations between family maltreatment perpetration and latent profiles of personal and family strengths among active duty Air Force members

Associations between family maltreatment perpetration and latent profiles of personal and family strengths among active duty Air Force members

APA Citation:

Jensen, T. M., Bowen, G. L., & King, E. L. (2022). Associations between family maltreatment perpetration and latent profiles of personal and family strengths among active-duty Air Force members. Journal of Family Violence. 37, 407–421. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10896-021-00274-5

Focus:

Child maltreatment
Couples
Mental health
Parents
Physical health
Trauma

Branch of Service:

Air Force

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Jensen, Todd M.; Bowen, Gary L.; King, Erika L.

Year: 2022

Abstract

Although individual and family strengths have been found to impact family maltreatment risk, optimal approaches to their assessment are lacking. To substantiate the utility of holistically assessing multiple strengths among active-duty Air Force members (i.e., Airmen) who might be at risk of perpetrating family maltreatment, the current study aimed to identify latent patterns of personal and family strengths among Airmen and assess associations with family maltreatment perpetration. A representative a sample of 30,187 Airmen from the 2011 Air Force Community Assessment Survey was used to identify patterns across latent-factor scores representing unit leader support, informal support, family functioning, individual fitness, and personal resilience. Latent profile analysis was conducted to extract an optimal number of response patterns and estimate associations with family maltreatment perpetration. A five-profile solution was optimal, representing patterns marked by low (10%), below average (26%), mixed (16%), above average (36%), and high (12%) levels of personal and family strengths. Predicted probabilities of family maltreatment among families not identifying as stepfamilies were 39%, 21%, 14%, 10%, and 8% across low, below average, mixed, above average, and high patterns, respectively. Among stepfamilies (20% of sample), predicted probabilities were 49%, 29%, 21%, 15%, and 12%, respectively. Findings encourage a holistic assessment of personal and family strengths among Airmen. The Personal and Family Strengths Inventory, which was developed to gauge these strengths, can position practitioners well to engage Airmen in conversations around strengths and growth opportunities for the purposes of service planning aimed at preventing family maltreatment.

20 Effects of emotion dysregulation on post-treatment post-traumatic stress disorder and depressive symptoms among women veterans with military sexual trauma

Effects of emotion dysregulation on post-treatment post-traumatic stress disorder and depressive symptoms among women veterans with military sexual trauma

APA Citation:

Lopez, C. M., Gilmore, A. K., Brown, W. J., Hahn, C. K., Muzzy, W., Grubaugh, A., & Acierno, R. (2022). Effects of emotion dysregulation on post-treatment post-traumatic stress disorder and depressive symptoms among women veterans with military sexual trauma. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 37(15-16), NP13143-NP13161. https://doi.org/10.1177/08862605211005134

Focus:

Mental health
Trauma
Veterans

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Veteran

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Lopez, Cristina M.; Gilmore, Amanda K.; Brown, Wilson J.; Hahn, Christine K.; Muzzy, Wendy; Grubaugh, Anouk; Acierno, Ron

Year: 2022

Abstract

Military sexual trauma (MST), defined as sexual assault or repeated, threatening sexual harassment while in the military, is associated with increased risk of long-term mental and physical health problems, with the most common being symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression. In addition to PTSD and depression, MST is linked to difficulties in emotion regulation as well as poor treatment engagement. Thus, it is important to examine these correlates, and how they affect postintervention symptom reduction in this vulnerable population. The current study presents secondary data analyses from a randomized clinical trial comparing the efficacy of in-person versus telemedicine delivery of prolonged exposure therapy for female veterans with MST-related PTSD (n = 151). Results of the study found that changes in difficulties with emotion regulation predicted postintervention depressive symptoms but not postintervention PTSD symptoms. Neither postintervention depressive nor PTSD symptoms were affected by treatment dosing (i.e., number of sessions attended) nor treatment condition (i.e., in-person vs. telemedicine). Findings from the current study provide preliminary evidence that decreases in difficulties with emotion regulation during PTSD treatment are associated with decreases in depressive symptom severity.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Last

Showing dictionary results for:

The degree to which data are stable. This term, from Lincoln and Guba (1985), is often preferred by interpretivists to the term

Category: Methodology

An interaction occurs when an independent variable has a different effect on the outcome depending on the values of another independent variable

Category: Methodology

"An umbrella term for people whose gender identity and/or gender expression differs from what is typically associated with the sex they were assigned at birth. People under the transgender umbrella may describe their gender identity using one or more of a wide variety of terms – including but not limited to transgender. The term “trans” is often used as shorthand. "

4 Gay

"A term used to describe a man who is attracted to another man; this term may also be used by women attracted to another woman. "

A document prepared by the evaluation client specifying the objectives, contents, organization, and timeline for the evaluation and defining the scope of work and responsibilities for the evaluation consultant(s).

Category: Methodology

6 Purple

“A term indicating that an activity or a program includes all branches of the U.S. Armed Forces.”

Category: Military

7 Post

“The Army term for a military installation.”

Category: Military

Related Terms:

Showing monthly topics for:

This website uses cookies to improve the browsing experience of our users. Please review Auburn University’s Privacy Statement for more information. Accept & Close