(334) 844-3299
MilitaryREACH@auburn.edu
Search Results
Make a new Search
Search in Library (15) Results

Library (15)

Showing library results for: July 2023

1 - 15 of 15

1 ‘One is too many’ preventing self-harm and suicide in military veterans: A quantitative evaluation

‘One is too many’ preventing self-harm and suicide in military veterans: A quantitative evaluation

APA Citation:

Finnegan, A., Salem, K., & Ainsworth-Moore, L. (2024). ‘One is too many’ preventing self-harm and suicide in military veterans: A quantitative evaluation. BMJ Military Health. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1136/military-2023-002623

Focus:

Veterans
Mental health

Branch of Service:

International Military

Military Affiliation:

Veteran

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


Share the article

Research

Authors: Finnegan, Alan; Salem, K.; Ainsworth-Moore, L.

Year: 2024

Abstract

Introduction In 2021, the Armed Forces Covenant Fund Trust allocated over £2 million to programmes designed to have a clear and demonstrable impact on suicide prevention. Four grant holders delivered a combination of psychotherapeutic interventions, group activities, social prescribing, peer support mentoring, life skills coaching, educational courses and practical help with housing and employment. The evaluation was completed between August 2021 and July 2023. Methods A survey was completed by 503 participants at entry and 423 at exit. It captured data regarding demographic and military-specific details, health status, situational stressors, predisposing symptoms, help-seeking behaviour, social engagement, housing, living arrangements and employment status. The questionnaire included a number of validated psychometric questionnaires. Results This evaluation revealed reductions in situational stressors, symptoms and mental health illnesses. Seventy-six per cent of participants had completed an Operational Tour, and 77% were exposed to a traumatic event during service. It was the negative impact of unresolved traumatic effects that influenced service-users to require support. Forty-nine per cent delayed seeking help, and 36% self-referred to the One Is Too Many programme which demonstrates the importance of this option. There were improvements in the participants’ social networking, social activities, club membership and having people to rely on. Only 4% of participants were women which reinforces the requirement to explore initiatives to engage with female veterans. Conclusions Timely therapeutic and social prescribing interventions in a safe environment lowered depression, anxiety and the associated situational stressors leading to self-harming and may have reduced suicide. It presented another option to veterans and their families regarding where they can obtain support, care and therapeutic interventions. The programme provided a strong foundation for delivery organisations to forge lasting collaborative partnerships that can be extended to working with other authorities and institutes. The results highlight pathways for prevention and intervention strategies to inform policymakers, healthcare professionals and third-sector organisations.

2 Migraine prevalence, environmental risk, and comorbidities in men and women veterans

Migraine prevalence, environmental risk, and comorbidities in men and women veterans

APA Citation:

Gasperi, M., Schuster, N. M., Franklin, B., Nievergelt, C. M., Stein, M. B., & Afari, N. (2024). Migraine prevalence, environmental risk, and comorbidities in men and women veterans. JAMA Network Open, 7(3), Article e242299. https://doi.org/10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2024.2299

Focus:

Veterans
Physical health

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Veteran

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)
Aged (65 yrs & older)


Share the article

Research

Authors: Gasperi, Marianna; Schuster, Nathaniel M.; Franklin, Brooke; Nievergelt, Caroline M.; Stein, Murray B.; Afari, Niloofar

Year: 2024

Abstract

Migraine is a prevalent and debilitating condition that substantially impacts quality of life. Investigating migraine prevalence, associated comorbidities, and potential military service exposures in veterans, focusing on gender differences, is crucial for targeted interventions and management strategies.To determine the prevalence of migraine, associated health comorbidities, and potential military service and environmental exposures among men and women US veterans using a large-scale epidemiological sample from the Million Veteran Program (MVP).This cross-sectional study analyzed self-report survey data from the MVP, a large epidemiological sample of US veterans that was started in 2011 and has ongoing enrollment. Eligible participants were selected from the MVP database in 2023. The study included 491 604 veterans to examine migraine prevalence, health comorbidities, demographic characteristics, military service history, and environmental exposures. Data were analyzed from December 2022 to July 2023.Military service and environmental factors, such as chemical or biological warfare exposure, were considered.The primary outcome was migraine prevalence among men and women veterans, assessed through self-reported diagnoses. Secondary outcomes included the association between migraine and health comorbidities, demographic characteristics, military service history, and environmental exposures.Of the 491 604 veterans included in this study, 450 625 (91.8%) were men and 40 979 (8.2%) were women. The lifetime prevalence of migraine was significantly higher in women (12 324 of 40 979 [30.1%]) than in men (36 816 of 450 625 [8.2%]). Migraine prevalence varied by race and ethnicity, with the highest prevalence in Hispanic or Latinx women (1213 of 3495 [34.7%]). Veterans with migraine reported worse general health, higher levels of pain, increased pain interference with work, a higher likelihood of psychiatric and neurological health conditions, and greater lifetime opioid use. Specific aspects of military service, including service post-September 2001 and deployment in Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom, and environmental factors, including Agent Orange, chemical and biological welfare, and antinerve agent pills history, were significantly associated with migraine prevalence.In this cross-sectional study of migraine, the results highlighted gender differences in migraine prevalence and associated health comorbidities among US veterans. The findings emphasized the need for interdisciplinary approaches to migraine management, increased awareness and education efforts, and population-based screening strategies, particularly for women and Hispanic veterans who are at greater risk. Our findings encourage further research into tailored interventions for specific subpopulations and the impact of military service and environmental exposures on migraine and related health conditions.

3 Exploring the social determinants of mental health by race and ethnicity in Army wives

Exploring the social determinants of mental health by race and ethnicity in Army wives

APA Citation:

Dodge, J., Sullivan, K., Miech, E., Clomax, A., Riviere, L., & Castro, C. (2024). Exploring the social determinants of mental health by race and ethnicity in Army wives. Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities, 11, 669-684. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40615-023-01551-3

Focus:

Mental health
Other

Branch of Service:

Army

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Dodge, Jessica; Sullivan, Kathrine; Miech, Edward; Clomax, Adriane; Riviere, Lyndon; Castro, Carl

Year: 2024

Abstract

Objective To explore the social determinants of mental health (SDoMH) by race/ethnicity in a sample with equal access to healthcare. Using an adaptation of the World Health Organization’s SDoMH Framework, this secondary analysis examines the socio-economic factors that make up the SDoMH by race/ethnicity. Method This paper employed configurational comparative methods (CCMs) to analyze various racial/ethnic subsets from quantitative survey data from (N = 327) active-duty Army wives. Data was collected in 2012 by Walter Reed Army Institute of Research. Results Initial exploratory analysis revealed the highest-scoring factors for each racial/ethnic subgroup: non-Hispanic Black: employment and a history of adverse childhood events (ACEs); Hispanic: living off post and a recent childbirth; junior enlisted non-Hispanic White: high work-family conflict and ACEs; non-Hispanic other race: high work-family conflict and not having a military history. Final analysis showed four models consistently explained clinically significant depression symptoms and four models consistently explained the absence of clinical depression symptoms, providing a solution for each racial/ethnic minority group (non-Hispanic Black, Hispanic, junior enlisted non-Hispanic White, and non-Hispanic other). Discussion These findings highlight that Army wives are not a monolithic group, despite their collective exposure to military-specific stressors. These findings also highlight the potential for applying configurational approaches to gain new insights into mental health outcomes for social science and clinical researchers.

4 “Sometimes, during deployment, it seems like we won’t make it”: U.S. military deployment transition issues as a precursor to couples’ reintegration issues

“Sometimes, during deployment, it seems like we won’t make it”: U.S. military deployment transition issues as a precursor to couples’ reintegration issues

APA Citation:

Weiss, J. K., & Anzur, C. K. (2024). “Sometimes, during deployment, it seems like we won’t make it”: U.S. military deployment transition issues as a precursor to couples’ reintegration issues. Journal of Family Issues, 45(4), 931-954. https://doi.org/10.1177/0192513X231162968

Focus:

Couples
Deployment

Branch of Service:

Air Force
Army
Navy
Marine Corps
Coast Guard
Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Weiss, Julia K.; Anzur, Christine K.

Year: 2024

Abstract

The bulk of the literature on the Relational Turbulence Model relating to U.S. military couples clusters around examining relational turbulence and communication issues when a service member returns from a deployment and reintegrates back into the home. Lacking in comparison is a deeper examination of turbulence and all of its related variables when the service member leaves the home to go on the deployment. The current study examines these components as they relate to overseas military deployment. A thematic analysis of participants? perceptions uncovered major themes of Relational Uncertainty, Partner Interferences, and Relational Turbulence along with several subthemes and additional subtheme-types. If we consider the well-established relational communication issues couples face during reintegrating, these findings suggest that those issues may actually stem from the perceptions of relational turbulence in the initial parts of the deployment cycle during deployment.

5 Adverse childhood experiences in military, veteran, and civilian families

Adverse childhood experiences in military, veteran, and civilian families

APA Citation:

Hinojosa, M. S., Hinojosa, R., Condon, J., & DaSilva, S. (2023). Adverse childhood experiences in military, veteran, and civilian families. Armed Forces & Society. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1177/0095327X231161365

Focus:

Child maltreatment
Children
Parents
Veterans
Trauma

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty
Guard
Veteran

Population:

Childhood (birth - 12 yrs)
Adolescence (13 - 17 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Hinojosa, Melanie Sberna; Hinojosa, Ramon; Condon, Josalie; DaSilva, Sarah

Year: 2023

Abstract

Adverse childhood experiences are traumatic early life experiences that can lead to poorer mental, physical, and social outcomes. Children in military and veteran families can face unique challenges compared with civilian families. This study utilizes data from 2017?2019 National Survey of Children?s Health to examine 56,655 children living in military, veteran, and civilian families to predict the prevalence of adverse childhood experiences. Findings indicate that children living in veteran families (compared with civilian families) have higher odds of witnessing parents use violence and witnessing parents with alcohol or substance use problems. Children in military families had higher odds of divorce and lower odds of experiencing parental death. It is also noted that children living in military, veteran, and civilian families are similar across other ACEs including the incarceration of a parent, child as victim of violence, living with family with mental illness, unfair treatment because of race, and difficulty covering basics like food and housing.

6 Propensity of US military personnel to seek mental health care when community psychiatric capacity changes

Propensity of US military personnel to seek mental health care when community psychiatric capacity changes

APA Citation:

Shen, Y.-C., Bacolod, M., & Heissel, J. A. (2023). Propensity of us military personnel to seek mental health care when community psychiatric capacity changes. JAMA Health Forum, 4(10), Article e233330. https://doi.org/10.1001/jamahealthforum.2023.3330

Focus:

Mental health
Programming

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


Share the article

Research

Authors: Shen, Yu-Chu; Bacolod, Marigee; Heissel, Jennifer A.

Year: 2023

Abstract

Importance Understanding how the active duty military population’s mental health care use is associated with local military and civilian psychiatrist capacity is critical in designing the optimal allocation of mental health resources from both sectors to improve the mental health of military personnel. Objective To evaluate whether the probability of mental health care visits by military personnel changes when psychiatrist capacity changes in their communities, when capacity is measured separately for military treatment facilities and civilian sectors. Design, Setting, and Participants This cohort study of active duty US military service members between January 1, 2016, and September 30, 2020, combines data from the Defense Health Agency, the National Plan and Provider Enumeration System, and the US Census. Data were collected and analyzed from June 2022 to July 2023. Main Outcomes and Measures The main outcome was the probability of making at least 1 mental health care visit in a given quarter at military treatment facilities and in civilian settings. Linear probability models with 2-dimensional fixed effects at individual and community levels were implemented to estimate changes in individual outcomes when community psychiatrist capacity changed. Results This study includes 1 958 421 US service members (83% men; mean [SD] age at baseline, 28.4 [8.0] years). Thirteen percent of service members did not have military treatment facility psychiatrists available within a 30-minute driving time, and 66% lived in communities with a psychiatrist shortage (3 psychiatrists per 20 000 relevant population) military treatment facility psychiatrist capacity. Five percent of service members lived in communities with no civilian psychiatrists within a 30-minute driving time, while 66% lived in communities with high civilian psychiatrist capacity. The mean quarterly mental health care visit rates to military treatment facilities and civilian settings were 7% and 2%, respectively. The probability of a mental health care visit to a military treatment facility increased by 0.95 percentage points (95% CI, 0.79-1.10 percentage points; equivalent to 14%) when the individual experienced a change in military treatment facility capacity from no psychiatrist to high capacity. The probability of a mental health care visit to a civilian setting increased by 0.57 percentage points (95% CI, 0.38-0.76 percentage points; equivalent to 32%) when civilian capacity changed from no psychiatrist to high capacity. The magnitude of responses to military treatment facility capacity changes remained similar in communities that already had high civilian capacity. Conclusions and Relevance This cohort study of the US military population suggests that active duty military personnel rely largely on military treatment facilities for their mental health care and that there are meaningful responses to military treatment facility psychiatrist capacity changes even in communities with high civilian psychiatric capacity. Realigning military treatment facility psychiatrists across communities with shortages and high-capacity military treatment facilities, as well as addressing nongeographical barriers in the civilian sector, remain critical to achieve the optimal balance between military and civilian care provision.

7 Examining the outcomes and acceptability of a peer-led spiritual intervention for moral injury in a veteran service organization

Examining the outcomes and acceptability of a peer-led spiritual intervention for moral injury in a veteran service organization

APA Citation:

Currier, J. M., McDermott, R. C., Fernandez, P., Salcone, S., Hinkel, H. M., Schuler, K., Fadoir, N., & Smith, P. N. (2023). Examining the outcomes and acceptability of a peer-led spiritual intervention for moral injury in a veteran service organization. Psychological Services. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1037/ser0000762

Focus:

Veterans
Mental health
Programming

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches
Air Force
Army
Marine Corps
Navy

Military Affiliation:

Veteran

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Currier, Joseph M.; McDermott, Ryon C.; Fernandez, Paola; Salcone, Sarah; Hinkel, Hannah M.; Schuler, Kaitlyn; Fadoir, Nicholas; Smith, Phillip N.

Year: 2023

Abstract

The purpose of this proof-of-concept study was to examine the outcomes and acceptability of a spiritual intervention for moral injury led by veteran peers in a Veteran Service Organization (VSO), called “Heroes to Heroes.” From baseline to 1-year follow-up, 101 veterans who participated in the intervention completed the evaluation surveys at four time points assessing psychological outcomes (moral injury, posttraumatic stress disorder [PTSD] symptoms, and life satisfaction), spiritual outcomes (spiritual struggles and spiritual transcendence), and their perceived helpfulness of the program. In addition, we conducted four focus groups with six to eight alumni to more fully understand veterans’ views and experiences of the program. Focusing on the longitudinal surveys, latent growth modeling analyses revealed veterans generally improved across the psychological and spiritual outcomes in the study. Specifically, veterans reported steady decreases in moral injury outcomes, PTSD symptoms, and spiritual struggles along with increased life satisfaction and spiritual transcendence over the 1-year period. An inductive content analysis of veterans’ responses to open-ended items in the surveys and focus group interviews revealed four possible mechanisms or facilitators of these outcomes: (a) social connectivity and belonging (e.g., shared vulnerability and camaraderie); (b) behavioral engagement in core aspects of their spirituality (e.g., sacred practices and visiting sacred places); (c) spiritual transformation and growth (e.g., closeness with God and divine forgiveness); and (d) appreciation for diversity (e.g., religious and military). Overall, these findings affirm the potential effectiveness and acceptability of the VSO’s peer-led spiritual intervention for promoting the holistic healing among veterans who are contending with emotional and spiritual wounds of war. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)

8 A prospective study of marital distress and mental health symptoms across the deployment cycle

A prospective study of marital distress and mental health symptoms across the deployment cycle

APA Citation:

Knobloch, L. K., & Whisman, M. A. (2023). A prospective study of marital distress and mental health symptoms across the deployment cycle. Journal of Family Psychology, 37(4), 507-516. https://doi.org/10.1037/fam0001079

Focus:

Deployment
Couples
Mental health
Trauma

Branch of Service:

Army

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Knobloch, Leanne K.; Whisman, Mark A.

Year: 2023

Abstract

Although recent findings imply that marital distress and mental health symptoms are intertwined among military personnel, a prospective longitudinal study is needed to evaluate the bidirectionality of the link between marital distress and mental health symptoms across the deployment cycle. We investigated over time associations using data from the Pre–Post Deployment Study component of the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS). Married soldiers (N = 2,585) reported on their marital distress, anxiety symptoms, depressive symptoms, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms 1 month before deploying to Afghanistan and 3 months and 9 months after they returned home. The data were analyzed using cross-lagged panel models, adjusting for a variety of demographic and military covariates (including deployment stress, measured 1 month after homecoming). Results indicated (a) no associations between marital distress and mental health symptoms during the 13-month lag from predeployment to postdeployment, (b) bidirectional associations between marital distress and symptoms of anxiety and depression during the 6-month lag from 3 to 9 months after homecoming, and (c) a unidirectional association from PTSD symptoms to marital distress during the 6-month lag from 3 to 9 months after homecoming. These findings shed light on a lingering debate about the directionality of the longitudinal association between marital distress and psychopathology. They also imply points of intervention to help buffer military personnel from the harmful effects of marital distress and mental health symptoms across the deployment cycle. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)

9 Military spouse mental health outcomes after receiving short-term counseling services

Military spouse mental health outcomes after receiving short-term counseling services

APA Citation:

Prosek, E. A., Burgin, E. E., Pierce, K. L., & Ponder, W. N. (2023). Military spouse mental health outcomes after receiving short-term counseling services. The Family Journal, 31(4), 580-586. https://doi.org/10.1177/10664807231163259

Focus:

Mental health
Programming

Branch of Service:

Army
Marine Corps
Navy
Air Force
Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Prosek, Elizabeth A.; Burgin, Elizabeth E.; Pierce, K. Lynn; Ponder, Warren N.

Year: 2023

Abstract

Research related to military spouses accessing community-based mental health care is limited. Evaluations identifying outcomes of anxiety, depressive symptoms, and resilience are scant. In this study, 71 military partners and spouses (age M?=?39.79, SD?=?11.32; 97.2% women) receiving counseling services at a nonprofit agency completed self-report measures of anxiety, depressive symptoms, and resilience pre?post a 6-week intervention. Less depressive symptoms predicted higher resilience at intake of services, with medium statistical significance. In pre?post analysis, no statistically significant changes were noted to anxiety, depressive symptoms, or resilience, with small to medium effect sizes and unimproved conditions with no clinical significance. This study represents an evaluation of services from a single site utilizing individual counseling services.

10 Evaluation of the Strength at Home group intervention for intimate partner violence in the Veterans Affairs Health System

Evaluation of the Strength at Home group intervention for intimate partner violence in the Veterans Affairs Health System

APA Citation:

Creech, S. K., Benzer, J. K., Bruce, L., & Taft, C. T. (2023). Evaluation of the Strength at Home group intervention for intimate partner violence in the Veterans Affairs health system. JAMA Network Open, 6(3), Article e232997. https://doi.org/10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2023.2997

Focus:

Couples
Mental health
Programming
Veterans

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Veteran

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)
Aged (65 yrs & older)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Creech, Suzannah K.; Benzer, Justin K.; Bruce, LeAnn; Taft, Casey T.

Year: 2023

Abstract

Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a serious and prevalent public health issue that is interconnected with experiences of trauma, mental and physical health difficulties, and health disparities. Strength at Home (SAH) is a group intervention for persons using IPV in their relationships. Although previous studies have provided evidence of SAH’s effectiveness in reducing IPV, its patient outcomes as implemented within organized health care have not been examined.To evaluate patient outcomes from implementation of SAH in the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) health system.This quality improvement study evaluated patient outcomes from a national implementation and training program conducted between December 11, 2015, and September 24, 2021. Data were collected as part of treatment and submitted by clinicians at 73 VA health care facilities. Patients were 1754 veterans seeking care aimed at addressing and/or preventing their use of aggression in intimate relationships. They completed 1 pretreatment assessment and 1 follow-up assessment in the immediate weeks after group completion.Strength at Home is a 12-week trauma-informed and cognitive behavioral group intervention to address and prevent the use of IPV in relationships.Changes in IPV were measured with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 2010 National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey. Changes in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms were measured with the PTSD Checklist for DSM-5, and alcohol misuse was measured with the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test.The study included 1754 participants (mean [SD] age, 44.3 [13.0] years; 1421 men [81%]), of whom 1088 (62%) were involved with the criminal legal system for IPV charges. Analyses indicate that SAH was associated with reductions in use of physical IPV (odds ratio, 3.28; percentage difference from before to after treatment, –0.17 [95% CI, −0.21 to −0.13]) and psychological IPV (odds ratio, 2.73; percentage difference from before to after treatment, –0.23 [95% CI, −0.27 to −0.19]), coercive control behaviors (odds ratio, 3.19; percentage difference from before to after treatment, –0.18 [95% CI, –0.22 to –0.14), PTSD symptoms (mean change, −4.00; 95% CI, 0.90-7.09; Hedges g = 0.10), and alcohol misuse (mean change, 2.70; 95% CI, 1.54-3.86; Hedges g = 0.24).In this quality improvement study of the patient outcomes after implementation of SAH, results suggested that the program was associated with reductions in IPV behaviors, PTSD symptoms, and alcohol misuse. Results also suggest that IPV intervention in routine health care at VA health care facilities was successful; extension to other organized health care systems could be warranted.

11 Pre-existing parental stress and youth internalizing symptoms predict parent-reported COVID-related stress in military families

Pre-existing parental stress and youth internalizing symptoms predict parent-reported COVID-related stress in military families

APA Citation:

Drew, A. L., Gregus, S. J., Steggerda, J. C., Smith Slep, A. M., Herrera, C., Cavell, T. A., & Spencer, R. (2023). Pre-existing parental stress and youth internalizing symptoms predict parent-reported COVID-related stress in military families. Military Psychology. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1080/08995605.2023.2187165

Focus:

Parents
Children
Mental health
Other

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches
Army
Air Force
Navy
Marine Corps
Coast Guard

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty

Population:

Childhood (birth - 12 yrs)
Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Drew, Alison L.; Gregus, Samantha J.; Steggerda, Jake C.; Slep, Amy M. Smith; Herrera, Carla; Cavell, Timothy A.; Spencer, Renée

Year: 2023

Abstract

Understanding the extent to which youth and families experienced COVID-related stress requires accounting for prior levels of stress and other associated factors. This is especially important for military families, which experience unique stressors and may be reluctant to seek outside help. In this prospective study, we examined the role of pre-pandemic family factors in predicting parent and youth stress during the COVID-19 pandemic. Participants were 234 families with at least one active-duty parent and a 3rd or 5th-grade child. Findings revealed that preexisting factors predicted youth and family COVID-related stress. Specifically, heightened pre-pandemic parental stress and youth internalizing symptoms were significant predictors of COVID-related stress. Implications for mental health professionals and other organizations supporting military parents and families during the COVID-19 pandemic as well as other times of upheaval are discussed.

12 The efficacy of postdivorce intervention programs for children: A meta-analytical review

The efficacy of postdivorce intervention programs for children: A meta-analytical review

APA Citation:

Herrero, M., Roca, P., Cormenzana, S., & Martinez-Pampliega, A. (2023). The efficacy of postdivorce intervention programs for children: A meta-analytical review. Family Process, 62(1), 74-93. https://doi.org/10.1111/famp.12807

Focus:

Parents
Children
Programming

Population:

Childhood (birth - 12 yrs)
Infancy (2 - 23 mo)
Preschool age (2 -5 yrs)
School age (6 - 12 yrs)
Adolescence (13 - 17 yrs)
Adulthood (18 yrs & older)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Herrero, Marta; Roca, Patricia; Cormenzana, Susana; Martínez-Pampliega, Ana

Year: 2023

Abstract

Preventive postdivorce interventions aim to help children cope with divorce and promote their adjustment. Nevertheless, questions remain regarding the concrete outcomes of these interventions and the intervention characteristics that influence them. This meta-analysis of 30 studies analyzes the efficacy of postdivorce interventions on children's symptomatology, personal resources, and adaptation to divorce. Likewise, it explores whether the intervention impacts the putative mediators from the family context and whether the characteristics of the studies themselves also influence the results. Using a data set of N = 4344 individuals, 258 effect sizes were calculated. Random effects analyses evidenced the impact of the interventions on specific variables instead of on children's global adjustment. There were no significant effects on children's mental health outcomes, and none of these effects were qualified by the moderators that were examined. Preventive postdivorce interventions had significant effects, specifically on children's divorce adjustment and self-esteem. The study of the moderators found that the interventions were generally homogeneous, and only one of the 20 moderators examined had a significant effect. Based on children's age, the interventions had an impact on family functioning only when they involved younger children, but this result should be interpreted with caution due to the small sample of studies. This meta-analysis provides evidence of the relevance of postdivorce interventions to critical variables as well as information about the role of the intervention characteristics in the effects and makes suggestions for future research on divorce interventions that encompass both practical and empirical developments.

13 The role of unit cohesion and perceived resilience in substance use disorder

The role of unit cohesion and perceived resilience in substance use disorder

APA Citation:

Ward, R. N., Erickson, A. J., Carlson, K. J., & Yalch, M. M. (2023). The role of unit cohesion and perceived resilience in substance use disorder. Military Psychology. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1080/08995605.2023.2189861

Focus:

Deployment
Substance use

Branch of Service:

Army

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty
Reserve
Guard

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Ward, Rachel N.; Erickson, Alexander J.; Carlson, Katie J.; Yalch, Matthew M.

Year: 2023

Abstract

Soldiers have high rates of substance use disorders (SUD), often in the aftermath of stressors experienced during military deployments. There are several factors that protect against SUD. For example, individual factors like perceived resilience and group factors such as unit cohesion may make someone less likely to abuse substances. However, there is little research on the differential influence of these resilience factors on SUD over and above deployment stressors. In this study, we examined the relative effects of perceived resilience, unit cohesion, and deployment stressors on SUD in a sample of 21,449 active duty and reserve soldiers from the U.S. Army (primarily White and male, mean age = 28.66, SD = 7.41) using structural equation modeling. We found that unit cohesion (ß = −.17) and perceived resilience (ß = −.16) had negative effects on SUD over and above deployment stressors. The study findings clarify research on resilience to SUD and have implications for addressing substance use in the military, specifically regarding the importance of building unit cohesion.

14 A qualitative exploration of the parenting experiences of ex-military fathers diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)

A qualitative exploration of the parenting experiences of ex-military fathers diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)

APA Citation:

Sturgeon, M., Burgess, G. H., & Murphy, D. (2023). A qualitative exploration of the parenting experiences of ex-military fathers diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Journal of Family Studies, 29(5), 2408-2429. https://doi.org/10.1080/13229400.2023.2185160

Focus:

Trauma
Veterans
Parents

Branch of Service:

International Military

Military Affiliation:

Veteran

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)
Aged (65 yrs & older)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Sturgeon, Michaela; Burgess, Gerald H.; Murphy, Dominic

Year: 2023

Abstract

The experience of post-traumatic stress has been implicated in adverse outcomes for trauma-exposed parents and their children. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore how ex-military service (veteran) fathers who had received a diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) experience and make sense of parenthood, their role as a father, and the parent-child relationship. Ten ex-military fathers from the UK who had been diagnosed with PTSD engaged in interviews which were analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA). The analysis resulted in four themes; ‘Not always being the father I want to be’, ‘Striving to protect’, ‘Developing insight and understanding’, and ‘Protective influence of children’. These themes captured participants’ experiences of the perceived negative impact of PTSD symptoms on parenting and an evolving view of the self as a parent in relation to this, taking action to protect children from distress and harm, the importance of developing insights and understanding both personally and within parent-child relationships, and the distracting and motivating influence of children and enjoyment of the parenting role despite the challenges experienced in the context of a PTSD diagnosis. Findings are discussed in relation to the extant literature, and clinical and research implications are outlined.

15 Attachment style and risk of suicide attempt among new soldiers in the U.S. Army

Attachment style and risk of suicide attempt among new soldiers in the U.S. Army

APA Citation:

Wang, J., Naifeh, J. A., Herberman Mash, H. B., Morganstein, J. C., Fullerton, C. S., Cozza, S. J., …Ursano, R. J. (2022). Attachment style and risk of suicide attempt among new soldiers in the U.S. Army. Psychiatry, 85(4), 387-398. https://doi.org/10.1080/00332747.2022.2062661

Focus:

Mental health
Other

Branch of Service:

Army

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty
Guard
Reserve

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Wang, Jing; Naifeh, James A.; Herberman Mash, Holly B.; Morganstein, Joshua C.; Fullerton, Carol S.; Cozza, Stephen J.; Stein, Murray B.; Ursano, Robert J.

Year: 2022

Abstract

Objective Among U.S. Army soldiers suicide attempts (SAs) are a significant public health concern, particularly early in service. We examined the association of attachment style with SA and suicide ideation (SI) among U.S. Army soldiers.Methods We analyzed survey data from new soldiers who participated in the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS). The sample consists of 38,507 soldiers entering Basic Combat Training (BCT) between April 2011 and November 2012. Attachment style (secure, preoccupied, fearful, and dismissing) was assessed using items from the Relationship Questionnaire. Lifetime (pre-enlistment) SA and SI were assessed with a modified Columbia Suicide Severity Rating Scale. Logistic regression analyses examined associations of attachment style with lifetime SA, SI, and attempts among ideators, after adjusting for socio-demographic characteristics.Results The secure attachment style was associated with lower odds of SA (OR = 0.76, 95% CI = 0.63–0.92), whereas preoccupied (OR = 4.63, 95% CI = 3.83–5.61), fearful (OR = 4.08, 95% CI = 3.38–4.94), or dismissing (OR = 1.56, 95% CI = 1.24–1.96) attachment styles were associated with higher odds of SA. Similar results were found for SI. Importantly, both preoccupied (OR = 1.67, 95% CI = 1.37–2.04) and fearful (OR = 1.70, 95% CI = 1.38–2.08) attachment were associated with attempts among ideators.Conclusion These findings highlight the clinical importance of attachment style in predicting suicidal behavior and as possible targets for intervention. A critical next step is for prospective research to examine whether attachment style predicts future suicidal behavior.

1
This website uses cookies to improve the browsing experience of our users. Please review Auburn University’s Privacy Statement for more information. Accept & Close