(334) 844-3299
MilitaryREACH@auburn.edu
Detailed Record
Share this Article

The role of positive emotion dysregulation in the relationship between childhood abuse and PTSD in a community sample of veterans

APA Citation:

Goncharenko, S., Forkus, S. R., Contractor, A. A., Kiefer, R., & Weiss, N. H. (2021). The role of positive emotion dysregulation in the relationship between childhood abuse and PTSD in a community sample of veterans. Child Abuse & Neglect, 114, 104979. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chiabu.2021.104979

Abstract Created by REACH:

This study examined whether positive emotion dysregulation explained the association between child abuse (e.g., emotional, physical, sexual) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in a sample of 465 Veterans. The authors hypothesized that victims of child abuse have more difficulty accepting and managing positive emotions, in turn contributing to the severity of PTSD symptoms (i.e., intrusion, avoidance, negative changes in thoughts and mood, and hyperarousal and reactivity). The study also examined gender differences in rates of child abuse and probable PTSD diagnosis (i.e., exceeding a particular score on PTSD assessment). Consistent with their hypothesis, the authors found positive emotion dysregulation to be an explanation for the association between childhood abuse and PTSD symptoms.

Focus:

Child maltreatment
Mental health
Trauma
Veterans

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches
Air Force
Army
Coast Guard
Marine Corps
Navy

Military Affiliation:

Veteran

Subject Affiliation:

Military families
Veteran

Population:

Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)

Methodology:

Cross-Sectional Study
Quantitative Study

Authors:

Goncharenko, Svetlana, Forkus, Shannon R., Contractor, Ateka A., Kiefer, Reina, Weiss, Nicole H.

Abstract:

Background The co-occurrence of childhood abuse and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among United States military veterans is highly prevalent and clinically significant. Emotion dysregulation is one factor that has been found to underlie the association between childhood abuse and PTSD, yet past research has focused exclusively on dysregulation stemming from negative emotions. Objective The current study extends existing research by clarifying the role of positive emotion dysregulation in the relation between childhood abuse and PTSD in a community sample of military veterans. Participants and setting Participants were 465 trauma-exposed military veterans in the community (Mage = 38.00, 71.6 % women, 69.5 % White). Method Using structural equation modeling, we tested the indirect association of childhood abuse to PTSD symptom severity through positive emotion dysregulation. Results The hypothesized model showed adequate model fit, χ2 (32, n = 465) = 176.22, p < .001, CFI = .97, RMSEA = .10, 90 % CI [.08, .11], SRMR = .04. Results showed that childhood abuse was indirectly associated with PTSD symptom severity through positive emotion dysregulation. Conclusions This finding highlights the potential utility of targeting positive emotion dysregulation in the detection and treatment of PTSD symptoms in veterans who experienced childhood abuse.

Publisher/Sponsoring Organization:

Elsevier Science

Publication Type:

Article
REACH Publication
Featured Research

Author Affiliation:

University of Rhode Island, SG
University of Rhode Island, SRF
University of North Texas, AAC
Northern Illinois University, RK
University of Rhode Island, NHW

Keywords:

childhood abuse, emotion dysregulation, posttraumatic stress disorder

View Research Summary:

REACH Publication Type:

Research Summary

This website uses cookies to improve the browsing experience of our users. Please review Auburn University’s Privacy Statement for more information. Accept & Close