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Showing library results for: Leanne Knobloch

Filters: Research Summary

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1 Communication of military couples during deployment predicting generalized anxiety upon reunion

Communication of military couples during deployment predicting generalized anxiety upon reunion

APA Citation:

Knobloch, L. K., Knobloch-Fedders, L. M., & Yorgason, J. B. (2018). Communication of military couples during deployment predicting generalized anxiety upon reunion. Journal of Family Psychology, 32(1), 12–21. https://doi.org/10.1037/fam0000344

Focus:

Couples

Branch of Service:

Air Force
Army
Coast Guard
Marine Corps
Multiple branches
Navy

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty
Guard

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


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Research & Summary

Authors: Knobloch, Leanne K.; Knobloch-Fedders, Lynne M.; Yorgason, Jeremy B.

Year: 2018

Abstract

This study draws on the emotional cycle of deployment model (Pincus, House, Christenson, & Adler, 2001) to consider how the valence of communication between military personnel and at-home partners during deployment predicts their generalized anxiety upon reunion. Online survey data were collected from 555 military couples (N = 1,110 individuals) once per month for 8 consecutive months beginning at homecoming. Dyadic growth curve modeling results indicated that people’s anxiety declined across the transition. For at-home partners, constructive communication during deployment predicted a steeper decline in anxiety over time. For both returning service members and at-home partners, destructive communication during deployment predicted more anxiety upon reunion but a steeper decline in anxiety over time. Results were robust beyond the frequency of communication during deployment and a host of individual, relational, and military variables. These findings advance the emotional cycle of deployment model, highlight the importance of the valence of communication during deployment, and illuminate how the effects of communication during deployment can endure after military couples are reunited. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved)

2 Depressive symptoms, relational turbulence, and the reintegration difficulty of military couples following wartime deployment

Depressive symptoms, relational turbulence, and the reintegration difficulty of military couples following wartime deployment

APA Citation:

Knobloch, L. K., Ebata, A. T., McGlaughlin, P. C., & Ogolsky, B. (2013). Depressive symptoms, relational turbulence, and the reintegration difficulty of military couples Following wartime deployment. Health Communication, 28(8), 754-766. doi:10.1080/10410236.2013.800440

Focus:

Couples
Deployment
Mental health

Branch of Service:

Air Force
Army
Marine Corps
Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty
Guard

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


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Research & Summary

Authors: Knobloch, Leanne K.; Ebata, Aaron T.; McGlaughlin, Patricia C.; Ogolsky, Brian

Year: 2013

Abstract

During reunion following wartime deployment, military couples are at risk for both depression and relationship distress (Bowling & Sherman, 2008). This article applies the relational turbulence model (Knobloch & Theiss, 2011a; Solomon & Theiss, 2011) to understand the difficulty military couples may experience upon homecoming. One hundred and eighteen military couples completed an online questionnaire once per month for the first 3 months upon reunion following wartime deployment. Multilevel modeling results indicated that people's depressive symptoms (H1), relational uncertainty (H2), and interference from partners (H3) predicted their difficulty with reintegration. A few partner effects were apparent as well. These findings illuminate the dynamics of the reunion period, extend the relational turbulence model, and suggest guidelines for helping military couples preserve well-being during reintegration following wartime deployment.

3 Communication mediators of the link between depressive symptoms and relationship satisfaction among Army Soldiers

Communication mediators of the link between depressive symptoms and relationship satisfaction among Army Soldiers

APA Citation:

Knobloch, L. K., & Basinger, E. D. (2020). Communication mediators of the link between depressive symptoms and relationship satisfaction among Army Soldiers. Family Relations. Advance online copy. https://doi.org/10.1111/fare.12447

Focus:

Couples
Mental health

Branch of Service:

Army

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty
Guard
Reserve

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


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Research & Summary

Authors: Knobloch, Leanne K.; Basinger, Erin D.

Year: 2020

Abstract

Objective We evaluated two fundamental communication processes, self-disclosure and destructive conflict management strategies, as mediators of the link between depressive symptoms and relationship satisfaction among married U.S. soldiers. Background Identifying the communication behaviors underlying why people with depressive symptoms are less satisfied with their romantic relationship is a high priority for research, and pinpointing relevant mediators is especially important among military personnel who face particular job stressors and relationship challenges. Methods We analyzed cross-sectional self-report data from a representative sample of 4,196 married U.S. soldiers who participated in the all-Army component of the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS). Results Mediation was apparent such that people's depressive symptoms had indirect associations with their relationship satisfaction through both their self-disclosure and their reports of their partner's destructive conflict management strategies. In contrast, mediation was not evident for their reports of their own destructive conflict management strategies. Conclusion Less self-disclosure and more destructive conflict management strategies by a partner may be reasons why soldiers experiencing depressive symptoms are less satisfied with their romantic relationship. Implications Communication skills training for self-disclosure and conflict management may help break the link between depressive symptoms and relationship dissatisfaction.

4 Relational turbulence among military couples after reunion following deployment

Relational turbulence among military couples after reunion following deployment

APA Citation:

Knobloch, L. K., McAninch, K. G., Abendschein, B., Ebata, A. T., & Mcglaughlin, P. C. (2016). Relational turbulence among military couples after reunion following deployment. Personal Relationship, 23(4), 742-748. http://doi/10.1111/pere.12148

Focus:

Couples
Deployment
Mental health

Branch of Service:

Air Force
Army
Marine Corps
Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Guard
Active Duty

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


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Research & Summary

Authors: Knobloch, Leanne K.; McAninch, Kelly G.; Abendschein, Bryan; Ebata, Aaron T.; McGlaughlin, Patricia C.

Year: 2016

Abstract

Reintegration following deployment is a pivotal time for returning service members and at-home partners. We test logic derived from the relational turbulence model about depressive symptoms, relational uncertainty, and interference from a partner as predictors of people's appraisals of turmoil during the post-deployment transition. Participants were 118 military couples who completed an online questionnaire once per month for the first 3 months after homecoming. Multilevel models predicting people's appraisals of turmoil revealed (a) actor and partner effects of depressive symptoms, (b) actor effects of relational uncertainty, and (c) actor effects of interference from a partner that were apparent beyond people's appraisals of turmoil during the previous month. These findings advance both theory and practice.

5 Communication of military couples during deployment and reunion: Changes, challenges, benefits, and advice

Communication of military couples during deployment and reunion: Changes, challenges, benefits, and advice

APA Citation:

Knobloch, L. K., Basinger, E. D., Wehrman, E. C., Ebata, A. T., & McGlaughlin, P. C. (2016). Communication of military couples during deployment and reunion: Changes, challenges, benefits, and advice. Journal of Family Communication, 16 (2), 160-179. http://doi/10.1080/15267431.2016.1146723

Focus:

Couples
Deployment

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches
Air Force
Army
Marine Corps

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty
Guard

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


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Research & Summary

Authors: Knobloch, Leanne K.; Basinger, Erin D.; Wehrman, Erin C.; Ebata, Aaron T.; McGlaughlin, Patricia C.

Year: 2016

Abstract

Theemotional cycle of deployment modelproposes that military couples face both obstacles and opportunities across the trajectory of deployment. Guided by the model, we seek to address gaps in the literature by investigating how 236 recently reunited service members and at-home partners (N = 118 couples) describe their experiences during deployment and reunion. Results of content analyses revealed a variety of changes to communication during deployment (RQ1), challenges of reunion (RQ2), benefits of deployment (RQ3), and advice for reintegration (RQ4). These findings bolster and extend the emotional cycle of deployment model; they also have practical utility for helping military couples navigate deployment and reunion.

6 Generalized anxiety and relational uncertainty as predictors of topic avoidance during reintegration following military deployment

Generalized anxiety and relational uncertainty as predictors of topic avoidance during reintegration following military deployment

APA Citation:

Knobloch, L. K., Ebata, A. T., McGlaughlin, P. C., & Theiss, J. A. (2013). Generalized anxiety and relational uncertainty as predictors of topic avoidance during reintegration following military deployment. Communication Monographs, 80(4), 452-477. doi:10.1080/03637751.2013.828159

Focus:

Couples
Deployment
Mental health

Branch of Service:

Air Force
Army
Marine Corps
Multiple branches
Navy

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty
Guard

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


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Research & Summary

Authors: Knobloch, Leanne K.; Ebata, Aaron T.; McGlaughlin, Patricia C.; Theiss, Jennifer A.

Year: 2013

Abstract

For military couples reunited following deployment, discussing or avoiding topics is a central dimension of communication. This paper theorizes about two predictors of topic avoidance that arise from a lack of confidence in social situations: generalized anxiety and relational uncertainty. In Study 1, 220 returning service members described issues they avoid discussing upon reunion. Content analytic findings indicated eight avoided topics. In Study 2, 118 military couples reported on topic avoidance for the first 3 months after homecoming. Multilevel modeling results revealed that the generalized anxiety and relational uncertainty of actors, but not partners, were consistent predictors of topic avoidance. The findings illuminate the complexities of communicating following a tour of duty.

7 Communicative experiences of military youth during a parent’s return home from deployment

Communicative experiences of military youth during a parent’s return home from deployment

APA Citation:

Knobloch, L. K., Pusateri, K. B., Ebata, A. T., & McGlaughlin, P. C. (2014). Communicative experiences of military youth during a parent’s return home from deployment. Journal of Family Communication, 14(4), 291-309. doi:10.1080/15267431.2014.945701

Focus:

Children
Deployment
Other
Parents
Youth

Branch of Service:

Air Force
Army
Multiple branches
Navy

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty
Guard

Population:

Childhood (birth - 12 yrs)
School age (6 - 12 yrs)
Adolescence (13 - 17 yrs)


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Research & Summary

Authors: Knobloch, Leanne K.; Pusateri, Kimberly B.; Ebata, Aaron T.; McGlaughlin, Patricia C.

Year: 2014

Abstract

The return home of a service member from tour of duty can be stressful for military families (Bowling & Sherman, 2008), but surprisingly little is known about how military youth communicatively experience a parent’s homecoming (MacDermid Wadsworth, 2010). This study draws on the emotional cycle of deployment model (Pincus, House, Christenson, & Adler, 2001) to examine the reunion period in military youth’s own words. Individual interviews were conducted with 31 military youth (age range = 10 to 13 years old). Participants identified four changes to family life (RQ1), including spending time together, experiencing emotional tranquility, returning to patterns in place before deployment, and having difficulty reintegrating the service member into everyday routines. Some military youth reported that the reunion matched their expectations (RQ2), but others noted that the reunion fell short of their expectations or that they did not expect the returning service member to be so tired or so irritable. Participants also described four issues of uncertainty (RQ3), including questions about the service member’s activities during deployment, reasons for joining and deploying, family life, and the possibility of future deployments. The article concludes by examining the theoretical and pragmatic implications of the findings.

8 Relational turbulence and perceptions of partner support during reintegration after military deployment

Relational turbulence and perceptions of partner support during reintegration after military deployment

APA Citation:

Knobloch, L. K., Basinger, E D., & Theiss, J. A. (2018). Relational turbulence and perceptions of partner support during reintegration after military deployment. Journal of Applied Communication Research, 46(1), 52-73. https://doi.org/10.1080/00909882.2017.1409906

Focus:

Couples
Deployment

Branch of Service:

Air Force
Army
Marine Corps
Multiple branches
Navy

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty
Guard
Reserve
Veteran

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


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Research & Summary

Authors: Knobloch, Leanne K.; Basinger, Erin D.; Theiss, Jennifer A.

Year: 2018

Abstract

The transition from deployment to reintegration can be stressful for returning military personnel and at-home partners, and support plays a key role in their ability to transition effectively. We draw on relational turbulence theory to advance predictions about how parameters of the relationship between returning service members and at-home partners predict their perceptions of their partner’s support during the post-deployment transition. We surveyed 235 individuals (117 returning service members, 118 at-home partners) who had experienced the transition within the past 6 months. Findings consistent with the theory indicated that relational turbulence partially mediated the negative associations that relational uncertainty and interference from a partner shared with partner support. Partner uncertainty was a direct negative predictor of partner support as well. We consider how these results extend theory, research, and practice.

9 Experiences of military youth during a family member’s deployment: Changes, challenges, and opportunities

Experiences of military youth during a family member’s deployment: Changes, challenges, and opportunities

APA Citation:

Knobloch, L. K., Pusateri, K. B., Ebata, A. T., & McGlaughlin, P. C. (2015). Experiences of military youth during a family member’s deployment: Changes, challenges, and opportunities. Youth & Society, 47(3), 319–342. doi:10.1177/0044118X12462040

Focus:

Children
Deployment
Youth

Branch of Service:

Air Force
Army
Multiple branches
Navy

Military Affiliation:

Guard
Active Duty

Population:

Childhood (birth - 12 yrs)
School age (6 - 12 yrs)
Adolescence (13 - 17 yrs)


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Research & Summary

Authors: Knobloch, Leanne K.; Pusateri, Kimberly B.; Ebata, Aaron T.; McGlaughlin, Patricia C.

Year: 2015

Abstract

The deployment of a family member can be very distressing for military children, but it also can supply opportunities for growth. This study addresses calls for research on the changes, challenges, and opportunities facing youth during a family member’s tour of duty. It uses the relational turbulence model to frame research questions about how children experience a family member’s deployment. Participants were 33 military youth ranging from 10 to 13 years of age who completed one-on-one, semistructured interviews. They reported several changes to family life (Research Question 1), challenges of deployment (Research Question 2), and opportunities of deployment (Research Question 3). The results contribute to the literature by advancing theory, by providing insight into children’s experiences in their own words, and by suggesting practical guidelines for helping youth navigate a family member’s deployment.

10 Relational turbulence and the post-deployment transition: Self, partner, and relationship focused turbulence

Relational turbulence and the post-deployment transition: Self, partner, and relationship focused turbulence

APA Citation:

Theiss, J. A., & Knobloch, L. K. (2014). Relational turbulence and the post-deployment transition: Self, partner, and relationship focused turbulence. Communication Research, 41(1), 27–51. https://doi.org/10.1177/0093650211429285

Focus:

Couples
Mental health

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches
Air Force
Army
Coast Guard
Marine Corps
Navy

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty
Guard
Reserve
Veteran

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Theiss, Jennifer A.; Knobloch, Leanne K.

Year: 2014

Abstract

This study applied the relational turbulence model to the communication of U.S. service members and at-home partners following the return from a tour of duty by evaluating three turbulence markers: (a) relational maintenance, (b) partner responsiveness, and(c) turmoil appraisals. Participants were 235 individuals (128 service members, 107at-home partners) who completed an online questionnaire within 6 months following reunion. Relational uncertainty and interference from partners predicted turbulence markers, and they partially mediated the association between relationship satisfaction and turbulence markers. Results suggest that the relational turbulence model is useful for illuminating the experiences of military couples during the post-deployment transition. Findings also point to turbulence markers that may be salient during a variety of relationship transitions.

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