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Showing library results for: Davina Quichocho

1 - 8 of 8

1 Retaining high-quality employees: Contextual considerations and strategies for facilitating retention within child care settings

Retaining high-quality employees: Contextual considerations and strategies for facilitating retention within child care settings

APA Citation:

Quichocho, D., Lucier-Greer, M., Nichols, L. R., O’Neal, C. W. (2019). Retaining high-quality employees: Contextual considerations and strategies for facilitating retention within child care settings. Auburn, AL: Military REACH

Focus:

Other

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches


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Research Report

Authors: Quichocho, Davina; Lucier-Greer, Mallory; Nichols, Lucy; O’Neal, Catherine Walker

Year: 2019

2 The role of interparental conflict in adolescent siblings’ distress: A multi-informant study of military families

The role of interparental conflict in adolescent siblings’ distress: A multi-informant study of military families

APA Citation:

Quichocho, D., & Lucier-Greer, M. (2021). The role of interparental conflict in adolescent siblings’ distress: A multi-informant study of military families. Children & Youth Services Review, 120, 105708. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2020.105708

Focus:

Parents
Children

Branch of Service:

Army

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


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Research & Summary

Authors: Quichocho, Davina; Lucier-Greer, Mallory

Year: 2021

Abstract

Military families navigate a combination of normative and military-specific stressors, and thereby may be at greater risk for experiencing interparental conflict (IPC). Using the ABCX Model, IPC was conceptualized as a family stressor associated with adolescent siblings’ distress outcomes (i.e., greater anxiety, lower positive adjustment), and siblings’ appraisals of IPC were conceptualized as the linking mechanism in this relationship. Within 117 military families, a service member parent, a civilian parent, and two siblings each individually reported on IPC in their family and the siblings reported on their own distress. Civilian parents’ reports of IPC were positively associated with their children’s IPC appraisals, but service member parents’ reports were not associated with their children’s IPC appraisals. Siblings who appraised greater IPC showed higher anxiety and lower positive adjustment outcomes. The indirect link between parent IPC reports and sibling outcomes, via sibling IPC appraisals, was significant for civilian but not service member parents across all outcomes. These findings highlight the importance of accounting for the health of the larger family system when working with adolescents and assessing the potential disconnect between parental accounts of IPC and adolescent appraisals of conflict when working with these families.

3 Community-based assistance for victims of domestic violence

Community-based assistance for victims of domestic violence

APA Citation:

O’Neal, C. W., Nichols, L. R., Quichocho, D., Herren, C., & Lucier-Greer, M. (2018). Community-based assistance for victims of domestic violence. Auburn, AL: Military REACH.

Focus:

Couples
Programming

Branch of Service:

Air Force
Army
Coast Guard
Marine Corps
Multiple branches
Navy

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


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Research Report

Authors: O'Neal, Catherine Walker; Nichols, Lucy; Quichocho, Davina; Herren, Claire; Lucier-Greer, Mallory

Year: 2018

4 Problematic sexual behavior among children and youth: Considerations for reporting, assessment, and treatment

Problematic sexual behavior among children and youth: Considerations for reporting, assessment, and treatment

APA Citation:

Lucier-Greer, M., Nichols, L. R., Peterson, C., Burke, B., Quichocho, D., & O’Neal, C.W. (2018). Problematic sexual behavior among children and youth: Considerations for reporting, assessment, and treatment. Auburn, AL: Military REACH.

Focus:

Children
Youth
Parents
Programming
Child maltreatment
Trauma
Mental health

Population:

Childhood (birth - 12 yrs)
Neonatal (birth - 1 mo)
Infancy (2 - 23 mo)
Preschool age (2 -5 yrs)
School age (6 - 12 yrs)
Adolescence (13 - 17 yrs)


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Research Report

Authors: Lucier-Greer, Mallory; Nichols, Lucy; Peterson, Clairee; Burke, Benjamin; Quichocho, Davina; O'Neal, Catherine Walker

Year: 2018

5 Coping and mental health differences among active duty service members and their spouses with high and low levels of marital warmth

Coping and mental health differences among active duty service members and their spouses with high and low levels of marital warmth

APA Citation:

Lucier-Greer, M., Quichocho, D., Frye-Cox, N., Sherman, H., Burke, B., & Duncan, J. M. (2020). Coping and mental health differences among active duty service members and their spouses with high and low levels of marital warmth. Military Psychology, 32, 425-431. https://doi.org/10.1080/08995605.2020.1803724

Focus:

Couples
Mental health
Parents

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty

Population:

Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


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Research & Summary

Authors: Lucier-Greer, Mallory; Quichocho, Davina; Frye-Cox, Nicky; Sherman, Haley; Burke, Benjamin; Duncan, James M.

Year: 2020

Abstract

This study examined the relationship between marital warmth (e.g., openly expressing affection, supportive behaviors) and assessments of coping (i.e., challenges coping with military life and self-efficacy in the context of stress) and mental health (i.e., depressive symptoms and anxiety symptoms) in a sample of active duty men and their spouses/romantic partners (N = 234 military couples). Results from a series of multivariate analysis of variance tests indicate that service members and spouses who reported higher levels of marital warmth also reported better coping skills and mental health compared to individuals in couple relationships that demonstrated lower levels of marital warmth. Intervention and prevention implications targeting social support and marital warmth are provided.

6 Youth sports and child health: A guide to understanding sports-related concussions and ways to promote safer play

Youth sports and child health: A guide to understanding sports-related concussions and ways to promote safer play

APA Citation:

Lucier-Greer, M., O’Neal, C.W., Quichocho, D., & Burke, B. (2018). Youth sports and child health: A guide to understanding sports-related concussions and ways to promote safer play. Auburn, AL: Military REACH.

Focus:

Youth
Physical health

Population:

Childhood (birth - 12 yrs)
Preschool age (2 -5 yrs)
School age (6 - 12 yrs)
Adolescence (13 - 17 yrs)


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Research Report

Authors: Lucier-Greer, Mallory; O'Neal, Catherine Walker; Quichocho, Davina; Burke, Benjamin

Year: 2018

Abstract

The Office of Military Family Readiness Policy requested a comprehensive review of the literature regarding concussions in youth sports as a means to inform policy and encourage best practices concerning the safety of young athletes. First, this report begins by defining concussions in youth sports, which are referred to as sports-related concussions (SRCs) within the academic literature, and then information is presented about the prevalence, symptomology, impact, and risk factors of SRCs. SRCs occur when an athlete experiences a sudden, forceful movement that causes the brain to twist or move rapidly into the skull; the collision of the brain into the skull can stretch, tear, or damage the brain’s nerve cells and disturb the chemical balance within the brain. This disturbance has the potential to impair the brain’s ability to accomplish essential tasks. Current estimates suggest that 1.1 to 1.9 million SRCs occur annually among youth. Next, a discussion is presented on how legislation and policies have positively influenced the health of young athletes and resulted in a significant decline in SRC rates. As of 2014, all 50 states and the District of Columbia enacted laws addressing concussions in youth sports, the majority of which are modeled after the Lystedt Law to include three core components: - Annual education for coaches, parents, and athletes regarding SRC symptomology - Removal from play guidelines following an SRC or suspected SRC - Return-to-play protocols that often include clearance from a licensed healthcare professional In this section, multiple research-based training opportunities and tools are provided to educate coaches, parents, athletes, and healthcare professionals on preventing, recognizing, and managing concussions. These resources are widely available and are derived from highly reputable sources, such as the Centers for Disease Control, the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine’s Sports Trauma and Overuse Prevention, the National Alliance for Youth Sports, USA Football, the Institute of Medicine-National Research Council’s Committee on Sports-Related Concussions in Youth, and the International Conference on Concussion in Sport. Finally, this report concludes with a series of actionable strategies rooted in policy and currently available tools.

7 A review and application of posttraumatic growth for enhancing the well-being of military service members and their families

A review and application of posttraumatic growth for enhancing the well-being of military service members and their families

APA Citation:

Burke, B., Lucier-Greer, M., Quichocho, D., Sherman, H., Nichols, L., & O’Neal, C. W. (2019). A review and application of posttraumatic growth for enhancing the well-being of military service members and their families. Auburn, AL: Military REACH.

Focus:

Children
Youth
Parents
Couples
Deployment
Trauma
Mental health
Physical health
Veterans

Branch of Service:

Army
Navy
Air Force
Marine Corps
Multiple branches

Population:

Childhood (birth - 12 yrs)
Infancy (2 - 23 mo)
Preschool age (2 -5 yrs)
School age (6 - 12 yrs)
Adolescence (13 - 17 yrs)
Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)
Aged (65 yrs & older)
Very old (85 yrs & older)


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Research Report

Authors: Burke, Benjamin; Lucier-Greer, Mallory; Quichocho, Davina; Sherman, Haley; Nichols, Lucy; O'Neal, Catherine Walker

Year: 2019

8 The Exceptional Family Member Program: Staffing and case management

The Exceptional Family Member Program: Staffing and case management

APA Citation:

O’Neal, C. W., Quichocho, D., Burke, B., & Lucier-Greer, M. (2018). The Exceptional Family Member Program: Staffing and case management. Auburn, AL: Military REACH.

Focus:

Children
Youth
Programming
Mental health
Physical health

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty
Guard
Reserve
Veteran

Population:

Childhood (birth - 12 yrs)
Neonatal (birth - 1 mo)
Infancy (2 - 23 mo)
Preschool age (2 -5 yrs)
School age (6 - 12 yrs)
Adolescence (13 - 17 yrs)
Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


Share the article

Research Report

Authors: O'Neal, Catherine Walker; Quichocho, Davina; Burke, Benjamin; Lucier-Greer, Mallory

Year: 2018

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