(334) 844-3299
MilitaryREACH@auburn.edu
Search Results
Make a new Search
Search in Library (5) Results

Library (5)

News (1)

Showing library results for: Clairee Peterson

1 - 5 of 5

1 Accepting influence in military couples: Implications for couples’ communication and family satisfaction

Accepting influence in military couples: Implications for couples’ communication and family satisfaction

APA Citation:

Peterson, C., & Lucier-Greer, M. (2022). Accepting influence in military couples: Implications for couples’ communication and family satisfaction. Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, 48(4), 1075-1094. https://doi.org/10.1111/jmft.12574

Focus:

Couples
Mental health

Branch of Service:

Army

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Peterson, Clairee; Lucier-Greer, Mallory

Year: 2022

Abstract

In popular relationship resources, accepting influence is regarded as a couple-level process vital for relational satisfaction. However, empirical research has demonstrated inconsistent evidence for these suppositions, with several studies identifying no associations between accepting influence and relationship outcomes, and, furthermore, several gaps in the literature remain with regard to our knowledge on accepting influence (e.g., little identified research on military couples or family outcomes). To address these gaps, a measure of perceptions of one's partner accepting influence was retrospectively created to examine accepting influence in Army couples (N = 244). With theoretical underpinnings from family systems theory, this study used an actor-partner interdependence approach to investigate the associations between partners’ accepting influence and couple communication satisfaction and satisfaction with the family. Service members’ perceptions of their partners’ accepting influence were associated with their own outcomes, whereas civilian spouses’ perceptions of partners’ accepting influence were related to both partners’ outcomes. Results suggest accepting influence may be an intervention point to improve couple and family outcomes.

2 Military adolescents' experiences of change and discontinuity: Associations with psychosocial factors and school success

Military adolescents' experiences of change and discontinuity: Associations with psychosocial factors and school success

APA Citation:

O'Neal, C. W., Peterson, C., & Mancini, J. A. (2022). Military adolescents' experiences of change and discontinuity: Associations with psychosocial factors and school success. Family Relations. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1111/fare.12740

Focus:

Youth
Mental health
Deployment

Branch of Service:

Army

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty

Population:

Adolescence (13 - 17 yrs)
Childhood (birth - 12 yrs)
School age (6 - 12 yrs)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)


Share the article

Research

Authors: O'Neal, Catherine Walker; Peterson, Clairee; Mancini, Jay A.

Year: 2022

Abstract

Objective Drawing from the contextual model of family stress, social support and depressive symptoms were examined as two psychosocial factors that may link experiences of change and discontinuity common to military families to military adolescents' school success (i.e., academic achievement, school engagement, and homework commitment). Background Many military adolescents experience frequent changes that create discontinuity (e.g., parental deployments, relocations) and can impact their school success. Research has not examined psychosocial factors as a possible mechanism explaining the link between family change and discontinuity and adolescents' school success. Method A path model based on 821 military adolescents' responses examined how experiences of family discontinuity were associated with adolescents' psychosocial factors and, in turn, their school success after accounting for grade level, sex, and racial/ethnic minority status. Indirect effects between family discontinuity and school success were also evaluated. Results For adolescents attending public school off the military installation, parental deployment was significantly associated with less social support, and recent relocation was significantly associated with elevated depressive symptoms. Both psychosocial factors were associated with adolescents' academic achievement, school engagement, and homework commitment. Implications Prevention and intervention efforts directed at enhancing both social support and positive mental health are discussed at various systemic levels including families, schools, and communities.

3 Post-High School Military Enlistment and Long-Term Well-Being

Post-High School Military Enlistment and Long-Term Well-Being

APA Citation:

Lucier-Greer, M., O'Neal, C. W., Peterson, C., Reed-Fitzke, K., & Wickrama, K. A. S. (2022). Post-high school military enlistment and long-term well-being. Emerging Adulthood. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1177/21676968221131854

Focus:

Mental health
Physical health
Youth

Branch of Service:

Army
Air Force
Navy
Marine Corps
Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty

Population:

Adolescence (13 - 17 yrs)
Childhood (birth - 12 yrs)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Adulthood (18 yrs & older)


Share the article

Research

Authors: Lucier-Greer, Mallory; O’Neal, Catherine W.; Peterson, Clairee; Reed-Fitzke, Kayla; Wickrama, K. A. S.

Year: 2022

Abstract

Longitudinal data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health were used to evaluate the impact of post-high school military enlistment during emerging adulthood. Comparisons were made between matched samples of emerging adults who enlisted in the military (n = 576) and their civilian counterparts (n = 576) on well-being over a decade later. Well-being was broadly conceptualized to reflect socioeconomic well-being, physical health, mental health, and risky lifestyle behaviors. Matching maximizes confidence that findings reflect differences due to enlistment, rather than pre-existing characteristics that contribute to both enlistment rates and well-being. No consistent differences emerged between the matched samples. Service members reported some indicators of better mental health (perceived stress, anxiety), yet higher rates of post-traumatic stress disorder diagnosis, and civilians reported some indicators of better physical health. Strengths-based perspectives and models that account for the concurrent possibility that military service may positively and negatively impact well-being are needed in future research.

4 Problematic sexual behavior among children and youth: Considerations for reporting, assessment, and treatment

Problematic sexual behavior among children and youth: Considerations for reporting, assessment, and treatment

APA Citation:

Lucier-Greer, M., Nichols, L. R., Peterson, C., Burke, B., Quichocho, D., & O’Neal, C.W. (2018). Problematic sexual behavior among children and youth: Considerations for reporting, assessment, and treatment. Auburn, AL: Military REACH.

Focus:

Children
Youth
Parents
Programming
Child maltreatment
Trauma
Mental health

Population:

Childhood (birth - 12 yrs)
Neonatal (birth - 1 mo)
Infancy (2 - 23 mo)
Preschool age (2 -5 yrs)
School age (6 - 12 yrs)
Adolescence (13 - 17 yrs)


Share the article

Research Report

Authors: Lucier-Greer, Mallory; Nichols, Lucy; Peterson, Clairee; Burke, Benjamin; Quichocho, Davina; O'Neal, Catherine Walker

Year: 2018

5 Military couples’ childhood experiences and romantic relationship satisfaction: The role of accepting influence

Military couples’ childhood experiences and romantic relationship satisfaction: The role of accepting influence

APA Citation:

Peterson, C., O’Neal C. W., & Futris T. G. (2022). Military couples’ childhood experiences and romantic relationship satisfaction: The role of accepting influence. Family Process, 61(2), 689-704. https://doi.org/10.1111/famp.12689

Focus:

Couples

Branch of Service:

Army

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


Share the article

Research & Summary

Authors: Peterson, Clairee; O’Neal, Catherine Walker; Futris, Ted G.

Year: 2022

Abstract

Although accepting influence (i.e., being open to the influence of others) is considered important for couple relationships, there is a lack of empirical research on the association between accepting influence and relationship satisfaction. Moreover, research has not examined what family experiences may precede one's ability to accept influence in later romantic relationships, although life course theory and the vulnerability stress adaptation model support the notion that stressful childhood experiences may be consequential for accepting influence adaptive processes, which, in turn, can impact relationship satisfaction. This study used dyadic, couple data and an actor partner interdependence model to investigate the associations between stressful childhood experiences, accepting influence, and relationship satisfaction in a sample of 229 military couples (with one male service member and one female civilian spouse) after accounting for elements of their military context (e.g., rank, number of deployments), relationship length, and mental health. The path model also estimated the indirect effects from both partners’ stressful childhood experiences to relationship satisfaction through accepting influence. Female spouses’ stressful childhood experiences were associated with their perceptions of male partners’ accepting influence, which, in turn, was associated with both partners’ relationship satisfaction, demonstrating partial mediation. Military couples, as well as other couples in stressful contexts, may benefit from interventions that address how prior family experiences impact current accepting influence processes. Moreover, accepting influence behaviors can be a tool for couples to utilize to mitigate the possible negative consequences of their stressful circumstances on their relationship.

1
This website uses cookies to improve the browsing experience of our users. Please review Auburn University’s Privacy Statement for more information. Accept & Close