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Showing library results for: May 2022

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1 Teaching military cultural competency to clinicians and clinical students: Assessing impact and effectiveness

Teaching military cultural competency to clinicians and clinical students: Assessing impact and effectiveness

APA Citation:

Isserman, N., & Martin, J. A. (2021). Teaching military cultural competency to clinicians and clinical students: Assessing impact and effectiveness. Journal of Community Engagement and Scholarship, 13(4), Article 12. https://doi.org/10.54656/wrqx5143

Focus:

Mental health
Veterans

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty
Veteran
Reserve
Guard

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


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Research & Summary

Authors: Isserman, Nancy; Martin, James A.

Year: 2021

Abstract

Military members, veterans, and their families belong to a unique American subculture. Studies have identified the need for mental health professionals to attain military cultural competency to practice more effectively within this subculture. As an 88-year-old counseling and training agency with a record of service to the military/veteran communities, it was appropriate that Council for Relationships commit to providing training in military culture for its therapists and students. From 2017 to 2019, the course highlighted in this paper was part of an approved Institutional Review Board (IRB) study intended to assess the success of graduate-level instructional activities focused on promoting participants’ military and veteran-related cultural competency. This article includes an evaluation of the 2013–14 four-day training on military culture that preceded the course. In both, the unique cultural factors associated with military and veteran service were addressed within the context of evidence-based behavioral health treatment. A survey of the four-day participant training and qualitative interview follow-ups revealed that information about the military and its impact on veterans and families promoted changes in attitudes, knowledge, and clinical practice for both experienced and newly trained clinicians. These findings were replicated in the three-year evaluation results. This assessment provides valuable insight about military culture training for practicing and future mental health clinicians. Since there is very little information available in the literature on successful military culture competency training, sharing these results with the broader military and academic communities will give others information on the important components of effective training programs for clinicians, thus, potentially improving therapeutic services to these populations.

2 Associations of humor, morale, and unit cohesion on posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms

Associations of humor, morale, and unit cohesion on posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms

APA Citation:

Ward, R. N., Carlson, K. J., Erickson, A. J., Yalch, M. M., & Brown, L. M. (2021). Associations of humor, morale, and unit cohesion on posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms. Military Psychology. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1080/08995605.2021.1996103

Focus:

Mental health
Deployment
Trauma

Branch of Service:

Army

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


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Research & Summary

Authors: Ward, Rachel N.; Carlson, Katie J.; Erickson, Alexander J.; Yalch, Matthew M.; Brown, Lisa M.

Year: 2021

Abstract

Military personnel experience many stressors during deployments that can lead to symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, not all military personnel who are exposed to deployment stressors develop PTSD symptoms. Recent research has explored factors that contribute to military personnel resilience, a multifaceted and multidetermined construct, as a means to mitigate and prevent PTSD symptoms. Much of this research has focused on the effects of individual-level factors (e.g., use of coping strategies like humor, the morale of individual unit members), with some research focusing on unit-level factors (e.g., the cohesiveness of a unit). However, there is little research exploring how these factors relate to each other in mitigating or reducing PTSD symptoms. In this study, we examined the association between deployment stressors, perceived unit cohesion, morale, humor, and PTSD symptoms in a sample of 20,901 active-duty military personnel using structural equation modeling. Results indicated that perceived unit cohesion, humor, and morale were positively associated with each other and negatively associated with PTSD symptoms over and above the effect of deployment stressors. These findings highlight the influence of resilience factors on PTSD symptoms beyond their substantial overlap and have implications for future research as well as the potential development of interventions for military personnel.

3 A review of evidence-based strategies to help military families navigate deployment

A review of evidence-based strategies to help military families navigate deployment

APA Citation:

Frye-Cox, N., White, M. L., O’Neal, C. W., & Lucier-Greer, M. (2022). A review of evidence-based strategies to help military families navigate deployment. Auburn, AL: Military REACH

Focus:

Children
Youth
Parents
Couples
Deployment
Mental health

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty
Guard
Reserve

Population:

Childhood (birth - 12 yrs)
Adolescence (13 - 17 yrs)
Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


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Research Report

Authors: Frye-Cox, Nicky; White, Micaela L.; O'Neal, Catherine Walker; Lucier-Greer, Mallory

Year: 2022

4 We’re stronger together: A collaboration to support military families during the COVID-19 pandemic

We’re stronger together: A collaboration to support military families during the COVID-19 pandemic

APA Citation:

Urbieta, D. A., Akin, J. L., Hamilton, W. M., Brock, W. W., & Yablonsky, A. M. (2021). We’re stronger together: A collaboration to support military families during the COVID-19 pandemic. Military Medicine, 186(S2), 23–34. https://doi.org/10.1093/milmed/usab213

Focus:

Mental health
Parents
Children
Couples
Deployment
Physical health

Branch of Service:

Air Force
Army
Marine Corps
Navy
Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty
Reserve
Guard

Population:

Childhood (birth - 12 yrs)
Preschool age (2 -5 yrs)
School age (6 - 12 yrs)
Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


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Research & Summary

Authors: Urbieta, Dehussa A.; Akin, Jennifer L.; Hamilton, Wendy M.; Brock, Whitney W.; Yablonsky, Abigail Marter

Year: 2021

Abstract

The COVID-19 pandemic has created challenges for every segment of the U.S. population, including military personnel and their families. The TriService Nursing Research Program’s Military Family Research Interest Group (FIG) formed a collaboration with Blue Star Families, a civilian non-profit organization, to identify potential issues faced by military families during the pandemic.The Pain Points Poll was introduced online by Blue Star Families, and findings were aggregated weekly between March 18 and May 26, 2020. Volunteer poll respondents were mainly recruited through social media outreach. FIG-informed questions were incorporated in week 4 of polling and focused on workplace environment, financial health, social support, physical and mental health, child behavior, utilization of family care plans, and general well-being. Data were collected to gain real-time insights into the major challenges posed by the pandemic. Findings from FIG-informed questions were collaboratively reviewed and analyzed by FIG and BSF teams. Data-driven recommendations were made to stakeholders to improve processes and reprioritize investments for services that aim to alleviate the impact of COVID-19 on military families.A total of 2,895 military family units (i.e., service members and spouses) responded to the poll, a majority of which (88%) represented active duty family units. Although the majority of families (range: 59%-69%) noted no impact to their finances, approximately one in five families endorsed dipping into their savings during the pandemic. A majority of respondents (69.5%) reported taking active measures to support their mental health, endorsing various strategies. Among parents of special needs children, 45% of active duty families and 60% of single-parent service members reported the inability to maintain continued services for their children. A majority of parents with school-aged children (65%) reported child behavioral changes due to their child’s inability to socialize with peers. Among military service members, 41% were concerned about obtaining fair performance evaluations during the crisis.The COVID-19 pandemic produced significant challenges for military families. Collaboration between military and civilian partners can inform policies and appropriate strategies to mitigate the impact of COVID-19 for military families. The findings presented here provide insight into areas where military families can be supported for optimal outcomes during unprecedented times.

5 Two perspectives on accommodation of PTSD symptoms: Partners versus service members

Two perspectives on accommodation of PTSD symptoms: Partners versus service members

APA Citation:

Kenny, J. J., Allen, E., Renshaw, K., Bhalla, A., & Fredman, S. J. (2021). Two perspectives on accommodation of PTSD symptoms: Partner versus service members. Couple and Family Psychology: Research and Practice. Advance online publication. http://dx.doi. org/10.1037/cfp0000184

Focus:

Mental health
Couples

Branch of Service:

Army

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


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Research & Summary

Authors: Kenny, Jessica J.; Allen, Elizabeth; Renshaw, Keith; Bhalla, Arjun; Fredman, Steffany J.

Year: 2021

Abstract

When military service members (SMs) experience symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), intimate partners may respond by accommodating these symptoms. Although prior research has found that this type of accommodation, as self-reported by the partner, is associated with individual and relationship distress for both members of the intimate dyad, little is known about how SMs directly perceive the frequency of partner accommodation and the distress they experience regarding this accommodation relative to the reports from the accommodating partner. The present study examined SMs’ perceptions of partner accommodation of SM PTSD symptoms and partner self-report of accommodation of SM PTSD symptoms in a nontreatment-seeking sample of 259 Army couples consisting of a male SM and a female civilian partner. Both partner and SM reports of partner accommodation were significantly and positively related to SM PTSD symptom severity and both SM and partner depressive symptoms and hostility and were significantly and negatively related to both SM and partner marital satisfaction. When considering the average frequency of partner accommodation of SM PTSD symptoms, SM reports and partner reports evidenced general agreement. In contrast, partners reported being more distressed, on average, about their accommodation than SMs were about the partners’ accommodation. Clinical implications of the findings and the utility of cross-informant perceptions of partner accommodation in clinical and research settings are discussed. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)

6 Deployment preparation, family functioning, and PTSD in returning veterans

Deployment preparation, family functioning, and PTSD in returning veterans

APA Citation:

Blessing, A., DeBeer, B. B., Meyer, E. C., Riggs, S., Kimbrel, N. A., Gulliver, S. B., & Morissette, S. B. (2020). Deployment preparation, family functioning, and PTSD in returning veterans. Military Behavioral Health, 8(2), 130-138. https://doi.org/10.1080/21635781.2020.1713265

Focus:

Trauma
Deployment

Branch of Service:

Army
Air Force
Marine Corps
Navy
Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Veteran
Guard

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


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Research & Summary

Authors: Blessing, Alexis; DeBeer, Bryann B.; Meyer, Eric C.; Riggs, Shelley; Kimbrel, Nathan A.; Gulliver, Suzy Bird; Morissette, Sandra B.

Year: 2020

Abstract

Returning veterans are at elevated risk for developing posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a psychological disorder that is associated with poor family functioning and difficulties in interpersonal relationships. Evidence suggests that better training and deployment preparedness can serve as a protective factor against PTSD; however, little research has analyzed their long-term impact on both PTSD and family outcomes. The current study examined the relationships among training and deployment preparedness, family functioning, and PTSD both cross-sectionally and prospectively in a sample of 98 post-9/11 veterans. Perceptions of deployment preparedness had a significant negative indirect effect on PTSD symptom severity through family functional impairment at baseline, and the effect remained significant at 8-month follow-up assessment. Veterans who indicated that they were better trained and prepared for deployment had significantly lower PTSD symptoms and family functional impairment, and these perceptions impacted long-term PTSD symptom severity. The results suggest that deployment training and preparedness can impact PTSD symptoms and family functioning, and have long-term consequences on veterans’ personal and family experiences.

7 Adverse childhood experiences, mental health, and relationship satisfaction in military couples

Adverse childhood experiences, mental health, and relationship satisfaction in military couples

APA Citation:

Khalifian, C. E., Bosch, J., Knopp, K., Delay, C., Sohn, M. J., & Morland, L. A. (2022). Adverse childhood experiences, mental health, and relationship satisfaction in military couples. Journal of Family Psychology, 36(4), 630-635. https://doi.org/10.1037/fam0000952

Focus:

Mental health
Trauma
Couples
Veterans

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches
Army
Navy
Air Force
Marine Corps

Military Affiliation:

Veteran

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


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Research & Summary

Authors: Khalifian, Chandra E.; Bosch, Jeane; Knopp, Kayla; Delay, Christophe; Sohn, Min Ji; Morland, Leslie A.

Year: 2022

Abstract

Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) have been found to influence one’s own mental health and relationship satisfaction in adulthood; however, the association between one’s own ACEs and their partner’s individual and relationship functioning has not been explored. Veterans (n = 103) and their significant others (S-O; total N = 206) completed assessments on ACEs, depression, relationship satisfaction, and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) symptom severity as part of a baseline assessment in a treatment outcome study for veterans with PTSD and their S-Os. Actor Partner Interdependence Moderation Modeling (APIMoM) was conducted. Higher ACE score was positively related to PTSD for all participants. Female S-O’s ACE score was positively related to their own depression, and male S-Os reported higher depression and lower relationship satisfaction when their partners reported a higher ACE score. Surprisingly, female veterans experienced higher relationship satisfaction when their S-Os reported a higher ACE score. ACEs are related differently to one’s own and one’s partner’s mental health and relationship satisfaction and should be assessed when conducting couple’s interventions. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

8 Families serve too: Military spouse well-being after separation from active-duty service

Families serve too: Military spouse well-being after separation from active-duty service

APA Citation:

Corry, N. H., Joneydi, R., McMaster, H. S., Williams, C. S., Glynn, S., Spera, C., & Stander, V. A. (2022). Families serve too: Military spouse well-being after separation from active-duty service. Anxiety, Stress, & Coping. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1080/10615806.2022.2038788

Focus:

Couples
Deployment
Mental health
Physical health

Branch of Service:

Army
Navy
Marine Corps
Air Force
Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty
Veteran
Guard
Reserve

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


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Research & Summary

Authors: Corry, Nida H.; Joneydi, Rayan; McMaster, Hope S.; Williams, Christianna S.; Glynn, Shirley; Spera, Christopher; Stander, Valerie A.

Year: 2022

Abstract

Background and Objectives Transitioning from military to civilian life can be challenging for families, but most research focuses only on the service member. We applied a life course model to assess spouse well-being following this important transition.Design Prospective, longitudinal survey of service members and their spousesMethods We captured three spouse well-being domains: psychological health, physical health, and family relationships. We identified differences between families who separated from service and those still affiliated (N = 4,087) and assessed baseline factors associated with spouse well-being after the family separated from service (N = 1,199).Results Spouses of service members who had separated from the military (versus those who had not) reported poorer mental health and family relationship quality at baseline and follow-up. After controlling for baseline differences, spouses whose families transitioned experienced a greater increase in PTSD symptoms and a steeper decline in quality of marriage. Spouses of active-duty service members reported greater increases in work–family conflict. Among families who had transitioned, the most consistent predictor of positive outcomes was baseline well-being. Protective factors included having more psychological and social resources and less financial stress.Conclusions Several protective and risk factors identified in the study may inform programming for families transitioning from active duty.

9 VA family service access and utilization in a national sample of veterans

VA family service access and utilization in a national sample of veterans

APA Citation:

McKee, G. B., Knopp, K., Glynn, S. M., & McDonald, S. D. (2022). VA family service access and utilization in a national sample of veterans. Psychological Services. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1037/ser0000626

Focus:

Veterans
Mental health
Other

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Veteran

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)
Aged (65 yrs & older)


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Research & Summary

Authors: McKee, Grace B.; Knopp, Kayla; Glynn, Shirley M.; McDonald, Scott D.

Year: 2022

Abstract

Relationship and family difficulties are common experiences for military veterans, who are able to access family services (i.e., couple and family therapy) through the Veterans Affairs (VA) Healthcare System. This study examines demographic, mental health, military, and referral source variables associated with referral to and utilization of family services using a large national VA dataset of 22,969 veterans who were referred to couple or family therapy from 2016 to 2019. Of those referred, 44.39% had a completed referral; among those who initiated therapy, 31.11% attended five or more sessions. Logistic regression was used to evaluate predictors of completed referrals and of attending five or more sessions of couple or family therapy. Veterans identifying as Black/African American, American Indian or Alaska Native were less likely to have a completed referral than non-Hispanic White veterans; moreover, veterans identifying as Black/African American or Hispanic were less likely to attend five or more sessions. Lower likelihood of a completed referral was also associated with rural county residence, being separated, post-9/11 service era, a substance use disorder diagnosis, and being referred by a psychiatrist, neurologist, physician, or nursing staff rather than a psychologist. Lower likelihood of attending five or more sessions was associated with a delay of 22 or more days to intake, an adjustment disorder diagnosis, and being referred from VA specialty care, or by a psychiatrist or neurologist. These findings may help inform efforts for outreach and service retention within VA family services in order to ensure equity in access to care and healthcare utilization. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

10 Veteran families with complex needs: A qualitative study of the veterans’ support system

Veteran families with complex needs: A qualitative study of the veterans’ support system

APA Citation:

Maguire, A. M., Keyser, J., Brown, K., Kivlahan, D., Romaniuk, M., Gardner, I. R., & Dwyer, M. (2022). Veteran families with complex needs: A qualitative study of the veterans’ support system. BMC Health Services Research, 22(1), Article 74. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12913-021-07368-2

Focus:

Mental health
Veterans

Branch of Service:

International Military

Military Affiliation:

Veteran

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


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Research & Summary

Authors: Maguire, Angela M.; Keyser, Julieann; Brown, Kelly; Kivlahan, Daniel; Romaniuk, Madeline; Gardner, Ian R.; Dwyer, Miriam

Year: 2022

Abstract

Families with complex needs face significant challenges accessing and navigating health and social services. For veteran families, these challenges are exacerbated by interactions between military and civilian systems of care, and the density of the veterans’ non-profit sector. This qualitative study was designed to gather rich, detailed information on complex needs in veteran families; and explore service providers’ and families’ experiences of accessing and navigating the veterans’ support system.

11 The impact of having a child with special healthcare needs on length of military service

The impact of having a child with special healthcare needs on length of military service

APA Citation:

Perkins, E. M., Sorensen, I., Susi, A., & Hisle-Gorman, E. (2021). The impact of having a child with special healthcare needs on length of military service. Military Medicine, usab495. https://doi.org/10.1093/milmed/usab495

Focus:

Physical health
Children
Youth
Parents

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty

Population:

Childhood (birth - 12 yrs)
School age (6 - 12 yrs)
Preschool age (2 -5 yrs)


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Research & Summary

Authors: Perkins, Elizabeth M.; Sorensen, Ian; Susi, Apryl; Hisle-Gorman, Elizabeth

Year: 2021

Abstract

In 2010, the National Survey of Children with Special Healthcare Needs revealed that parents of children with special healthcare needs (CSHCN) report employment decisions are influenced by healthcare coverage needs. The U.S. military healthcare system arguably offers service member parents of CSHCN with the most comprehensive, inexpensive, long-term healthcare in the country—potentially increasing their incentive to remain in the military. This study explored the effect of having a CSHCN on the length of parental military service.A retrospective cohort was formed using the Military Health System database from 2008 to 2018. Included children were <10 years in 2010 and received ≥1 year of military healthcare between 2008 and 2010. The Pediatric Medical Complexity Algorithm categorized children as having special healthcare needs via ICD 9/10 codes as having complex chronic (C-CD), non-complex chronic (NC-CD), or no chronic disease (CD). Families were classified by the child with the most complex healthcare need. Duration of military healthcare eligibility measured parental length of service (LOS). ANOVA and linear regression analysis compared LOS by category. Logistic regression determined odds of parental LOS lasting the full 8-year study length. Adjusted analyses controlled for child age and sex, and military parent sex, rank, and marital status.Over 1.45 million children in 915,584 families were categorized as per the algorithm. Of individual children included, 292,050 (20.1%) were CSHCN including those with complex chronic and non-complex chronic conditions. After grouping by family, 80,909 (8.8%) families had a child/children with C-CD (mean LOS 6.39 years), 170,787 (18.7%) families had a child/children with NC-CD (mean LOS 6.41 years), and 663,888 (72.5%) families had children with no CD (mean LOS 5.7 years). In adjusted analysis, parents of children with C-CD and NC-CD served 0.4 [0.37-0.42] and 0.33 [0.31-0.34] years longer than parents of children with no CD; odds of parents serving for the full study period were increased 33% (1.33 [1.31-1.36]) in families of children with C-CD and 27% (1.27 [1.26-1.29]) in families of children with NC-CD. Findings indicate that military parents of CSHCN serve longer military careers than parents of children with no chronic conditions. Continued provision of free, high-quality healthcare coverage for dependent children may be important for service member retention. Retaining trained and experienced service members is key to ensuring a ready and lethal U.S. military.

12 Prospective mental health effects of intimate partner stalking among women veterans

Prospective mental health effects of intimate partner stalking among women veterans

APA Citation:

Davin, K. R., Dardis, C. M., Barth, M. R., & Iverson, K. M. (2022). Prospective mental health effects of intimate partner stalking among women veterans. Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy, 14(5), 751–758. https://doi.org/10.1037/tra0001144

Focus:

Veterans
Mental health
Trauma

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Veteran

Population:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)


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Research & Summary

Authors: Davin, Katie R.; Dardis, Christina M.; Barth, Michelle R.; Iverson, Katherine M.

Year: 2022

Abstract

Objective: Women veterans are disproportionately affected by intimate partner violence (IPV). Within the civilian literature, intimate partner stalking (IPS) is a common, uniquely deleterious form of IPV; the present study seeks to prospectively examine the psychological effects of IPS among women veterans. Method: Women veterans (n = 266) were recruited using the KnowledgePanel, a probability-based survey panel; participants completed surveys at time 1 (T1) and at time 2 (T2) follow-up 18 months later. Women responded to questionnaires assessing IPV and IPS experiences, and symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and anxiety. Results: At T1, 54.5% of women reported lifetime IPV, of whom 64.1% reported IPS; at T2, 49.2% reported past-year IPV, of whom 7.6% experienced past-year IPS. Bivariately, women in the T1 IPS group reported higher T2 PTSD, depression, and anxiety symptoms than the T1 IPV only and no IPV groups. In a multivariate model, there remained indirect effects of T1 IPS on T2 PTSD symptoms, when other forms of violence (i.e., T1 and T2 IPV, MST, IPS) were controlled. Conclusions: When added to models including other forms of IPV, women who experienced IPS reported increased risk for PTSD symptoms, which predicted heightened PTSD symptoms over time. Providers treating women veterans should assess for experiences of IPS as an additional form of IPV and address PTSD to prevent the development of subsequent comorbid psychopathology. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)

13 Examination of the interaction between parental military-status and race among non-Hispanic Black and non-Hispanic White adolescents with overweight/obesity

Examination of the interaction between parental military-status and race among non-Hispanic Black and non-Hispanic White adolescents with overweight/obesity

APA Citation:

Higgins Neyland, M. K., Shank, L. M., Lavender, J. M., Burke, N. L., Rice, A., Gallagher-Teske, J... Tanofsky-Kraff, M. (2022). Examination of the interaction between parental military-status and race among non-Hispanic Black and non-Hispanic White adolescents with overweight/obesity. Journal of Pediatric Psychology, jsac008. https://doi.org/10.1093/jpepsy/jsac008

Focus:

Physical health
Children
Mental health
Youth

Branch of Service:

Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty
Veteran

Population:

School age (6 - 12 yrs)
Adolescence (13 - 17 yrs)


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Research & Summary

Authors: Higgins Neyland, M. K.; Shank, Lisa M.; Lavender, Jason M.; Burke, Natasha L.; Rice, Alexander; Gallagher-Teske, Julia; Markos, Bethelhem; Faulkner, Loie M.; Djan, Kweku G.; Kwarteng, Esther A.; LeMay-Russell, Sarah; Parker, Megan N.; Schvey, Natasha A.; Sbrocco, Tracy; Wilfley, Denise E.; Ford, Brian; Ford, Caitlin; Haigney, Mark; Klein, David A.; Olsen, Cara H.; Quinlan, Jeffrey; Jorgensen, Sarah; Brady, Sheila; Shomaker, Lauren B.; Yanovski, Jack A.; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian

Year: 2022

Abstract

Adolescent military-dependents experience distinct risk and protective factors, which may necessitate additional clinical considerations. In civilian youth, overweight/obesity is associated with eating, internalizing, and externalizing difficulties, with some studies reporting more difficulties among non-Hispanic White (vs. non-Hispanic Black) youth. It is unknown if these disparities exist among adolescent military-dependents, or between civilian and military-dependent youth. Non-Hispanic Black (187 civilian, 38 military-dependent) and non-Hispanic White (205 civilian, 84 military-dependent) adolescents with overweight/obesity (14.7 ± 1.6 years; 73.9% girls; body mass index adjusted for age and sex 1.9 ± 0.5) completed a disordered-eating interview; parents completed a measure assessing their child’s internalizing and externalizing difficulties. Multiple linear regressions examined parental military-status as a moderator of the relationship of participant race with eating, internalizing, and externalizing difficulties.  White civilian youth with overweight/obesity reported significantly greater disordered-eating than their Black peers (p < .001); there were no other significant racial differences. In all regressions, parental military-status significantly moderated the association between race and each dependent variable (ps < .047). Black military-dependents (vs. civilians) reported more disordered-eating and internalizing difficulties (ps = .01). White military-dependents (vs. civilians) reported fewer externalizing difficulties (p = .01). Black adolescent military-dependents with overweight/obesity may experience more eating and internalizing difficulties (vs. civilians), a pattern not observed among White participants. Future work should examine if being a military-dependent and a historically marginalized racial group member accounts for these findings. Such data may inform providers of youth with intersecting minority identities.

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