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REACH Dictionary
E Clear

See Bronfenbrenner's Ecological Theory

Category: Theories

Ecological resilience refers to the extent to which a family can resist disturbance without resulting in structural changes, or how long it takes for resilience to mediate the transition back to stability after a disturbance occurs.

Citation: Gunderson, L. H. (2000). Ecological resilience: In theory and application. Annual Reviews of Ecological Systems, 31, 425-439. Retrieved from https://www.annualreviews.org/doi/pdf/10.1146/annurev.ecolsys.31.1.425

Category: Theories

Related Terms:

Effect size is a statistical tool used to measure the practical significance of a measured relationship between variables. Effect size is reported as being small, medium, or large.

Category: Data analyses

Effectiveness refers to the ability of some program or intervention to produce the desired results under real-world conditions.

Citation: Turner J.R. (2013) Efficacy. In: Gellman M.D., Turner J.R. (eds) Encyclopedia of Behavioral Medicine. Springer, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-1005-9

Category: Programs, therapies, and resources

Efficacy refers to the ability of some program or intervention to produce the desired results under ideal, controlled circumstances.

Citation: Turner J.R. (2013) Efficacy. In: Gellman M.D., Turner J.R. (eds) Encyclopedia of Behavioral Medicine. Springer, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-1005-9

Category: Programs, therapies, and resources

The ability to allow oneself to experience emotions, even unpleasant emotions, without judgement.

Citation: Pedneault, K., & Tull, M. T. (2005). Assessing mindfulness and experiential acceptance: Attempts to capture inherently elusive phenomena. In S. M. Orsillo & L. Roemer (Eds.), Series in anxiety and related disorders. Acceptance and mindfulness-based approaches to anxiety: Conceptualization and treatment (pp. 71–99). Springer.

Category: Programs, therapies, and resources

An inability to manage negative emotions, resulting in extreme, often inappropriate, responses.

Citation: Aldea, M. A., & Rice, K. G. (2006). The role of emotional dysregulation in perfectionism and psychological distress. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 53(4), 498.

Category: Theories

The ability to recognize an emotion and distinguish one emotion from another.

Citation: Salovey, P., Woolery, A., & Mayer, J. D. (2001). Emotional intelligence: Conceptualization and measurement. In G. J. O. Fletcher and M. S. Clark (Eds.), The handbook of social psychology: Interpersonal processes (pp. 279-307). Blackwell Publishers.

Category: Programs, therapies, and resources

Related Terms:

The ability to adaptively alter one’s emotions even in the face of emotional distress.

Citation: Gratz, K. L., & Tull, M. T. (2010). Emotion regulation as a mechanism of change in acceptance-and mindfulness-based treatments. In R. A. Baer (Ed.), Assessing mindfulness and acceptance: Illuminating the processes of change (pp. 107 – 134). New Harbinger Publications.

Category: Programs, therapies, and resources

Related Terms:

Emotion work refers to the process of adapting an emotion or feeling to be appropriate for the present situation and context.

Category: Theories

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