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REACH Dictionary
E Clear

See Bronfenbrenner's Ecological Theory

Category: Theories

Ecological resilience refers to the extent to which a family can resist disturbance without resulting in structural changes, or how long it takes for resilience to mediate the transition back to stability after a disturbance occurs.

Citation: Gunderson, L. H. (2000). Ecological resilience: In theory and application. Annual Reviews of Ecological Systems, 31, 425-439. Retrieved from https://www.annualreviews.org/doi/pdf/10.1146/annurev.ecolsys.31.1.425

Category: Theories

Related Terms:

Effect size is a statistical tool used to measure the practical significance of a measured relationship between variables. Effect size is reported as being small, medium, or large.

Category: Data analyses

Effectiveness refers to the ability of some program or intervention to produce the desired results under real-world conditions.

Citation: Turner J.R. (2013) Efficacy. In: Gellman M.D., Turner J.R. (eds) Encyclopedia of Behavioral Medicine. Springer, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-1005-9

Category: Programs, therapies, and resources

Efficacy refers to the ability of some program or intervention to produce the desired results under ideal, controlled circumstances.

Citation: Turner J.R. (2013) Efficacy. In: Gellman M.D., Turner J.R. (eds) Encyclopedia of Behavioral Medicine. Springer, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-1005-9

Category: Programs, therapies, and resources

The ability to allow oneself to experience emotions, even unpleasant emotions, without judgement.

Citation: Pedneault, K., & Tull, M. T. (2005). Assessing mindfulness and experiential acceptance: Attempts to capture inherently elusive phenomena. In S. M. Orsillo & L. Roemer (Eds.), Series in anxiety and related disorders. Acceptance and mindfulness-based approaches to anxiety: Conceptualization and treatment (pp. 71–99). Springer.

Category: Programs, therapies, and resources

The ability to recognize an emotion and distinguish one emotion from another.

Citation: Salovey, P., Woolery, A., & Mayer, J. D. (2001). Emotional intelligence: Conceptualization and measurement. In G. J. O. Fletcher and M. S. Clark (Eds.), The handbook of social psychology: Interpersonal processes (pp. 279-307). Blackwell Publishers.

Category: Programs, therapies, and resources

Related Terms:

The ability to adaptively alter one’s emotions even in the face of emotional distress.

Citation: Gratz, K. L., & Tull, M. T. (2010). Emotion regulation as a mechanism of change in acceptance-and mindfulness-based treatments. In R. A. Baer (Ed.), Assessing mindfulness and acceptance: Illuminating the processes of change (pp. 107 – 134). New Harbinger Publications.

Category: Programs, therapies, and resources

Related Terms:

Emotion work refers to the process of adapting an emotion or feeling to be appropriate for the present situation and context.

Category: Theories

Emotional boundaries are the barriers that separates an individual's thoughts and feelings from those of other people. An example of setting emotional boundaries includes not taking responsibility for another person's feelings.

Category: Theories

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