(334) 844-3299
MilitaryREACH@auburn.edu
Detailed Record
Share this Article

Associations of combat exposure and parental locus of control in deployed mothers and fathers

APA Citation:

Darawshy, N. A., Gewirtz, A. H., Cheng, C. H., & Piehler, T. (2022). Associations of combat exposure and parental locus of control in deployed mothers and fathers. Family Relations. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1111/fare.12725

Abstract Created by REACH:

Guided by the military family stress model, this study examined the associations among combat exposure (e.g., going on combat patrol), posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, and parental locus of control (i.e., self-perceptions of internal parental control, responsibility, and efficacy) in Service members/Veterans (SM/Vs). The study also examined whether these associations differed between mothers and fathers. Self-reported data were from 538 SM/V parents (n = 117 mothers; n = 421 fathers) with at least one child aged 4–12 years. Parents had participated in a version of the After Deployment Adaptive Parenting Tools (ADAPT) program, a parenting program for military families postdeployment. Overall, PTSD symptoms partially explained the relationship between combat exposure and parental locus of control. This association did not differ between mothers and fathers.

Focus:

Deployment
Parents
Trauma
Mental health
Veterans

Branch of Service:

Army
Air Force
Navy
Marine Corps
Multiple branches

Military Affiliation:

Active Duty
Guard
Reserve
Veteran

Subject Affiliation:

Active duty service member
Spouse of service member or veteran
Guard/Reserve member

Population:

Young adulthood (18 - 29 yrs)
Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Thirties (30 - 39 yrs)
Middle age (40 - 64 yrs)

Methodology:

Quantitative Study
Cross sectional study
Secondary Analysis

Authors:

Darawshy, Neveen Ali-Saleh, Gewirtz, Abigail H., Cheng, Cheuk H., Piehler, Timothy

Abstract:

Objective Relying upon the military family stress model, we evaluated the associations between combat exposure, PTSD symptoms, and parental locus of control (PLOC) among mothers and fathers with history of deployment, using a multigroup analysis. Background Few studies have investigated the correlates of deployment-related stressors for deployed mothers and none have examined perceptions of parenting efficacy. The relationship between combat exposure and PTSD symptoms may differ by gender. Method The sample (421 fathers and 117 mothers) was selected by combining baseline data from two distinct randomized controlled trials of a parenting program for post-deployed military families: ADAPT and ADAPT 4 U (Gewirtz et al., 2018a). Results Our analyses revealed a significant indirect effect of PTSD symptoms between combat exposure and PLOC, among deployed parents, with no gender differences in the indirect effect. Conclusion Relationships between combat exposure, PTSD symptoms, and PLOC support a military family stress model, and highlight the need to support parents with PTSD symptoms because PTSD symptoms appear to be a mechanism through which combat exposure affects parenting beliefs and perceptions. Implications Prevention and intervention research should focus on how parenting programs might help to reduce PTSD symptoms and improve parental perceptions of efficacy, confidence, and control.

Publisher/Sponsoring Organization:

Wiley Online

Publication Type:

Article
REACH Publication
Featured Research

Author Affiliation:

The Louis and Gabi Weisfeld School of Social Work, Bar-Ilan University, NAD
Department of Psychology and REACH Institute, Arizona State University, AHG
Department of Family Social Science, University of Minnesota–Twin Cities, CHC
Department of Family Social Science, University of Minnesota–Twin Cities, TP

Keywords:

military family stress model, PTSD, combat exposure

View Research Summary:

REACH Publication Type:

Research Summary

Sponsors:

The ADAPT study was funded by a grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse, grant no. DA030114 to Abigail Gewirtz. The ADAPT4U study was funded by the Department of Defense; grant no. W81XWH-1-14-0143 (PI: Gewirtz).

REACH Newsletter:

  December 2022

This website uses cookies to improve the browsing experience of our users. Please review Auburn University’s Privacy Statement for more information. Accept & Close